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Re: Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see EMBO prices decrease? Crawshaw, Lesley A <[log in to unmask]> 2009-11-13 08:20
From: "Crawshaw, Lesley A" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see
EMBO prices decrease?
It seems that EMBO and NPG have listened and reduced the 2010 site licence pricing to EMBO Journal/EMBO Reports by 9% on the 2009 site licence list price.
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [LIS-E-RESOURCES] Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see EMBO prices decrease?
Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see EMBO
prices decrease?
of an Open access option for authors (EMBO Open). Also, it was announced
that the site license pricing model for the EMBO package would move to a
mixed revenue model if subscription charges and publication fees, with
compensatory measure, we do not believe that year to year fluctuations
should be "averaged out", as this would make pricing intransparent and
set a wrong market signal. If publishers like NPG/EMBO do not keep their
promise to adjust their pricing in response to increased OA uptake and
published output, we in effect have an additional revenue model, not a
For the full paper, cf.
http://www.ub.uni-stuttgart.de/ejournals/Hybrid_journal_pricing_EMBO.doc
Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see EMBO prices decrease? Bernd-Christoph Kämper <[log in to unmask]> 2009-10-20 15:13
<[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see
EMBO prices decrease?
Hybrid Journal pricing (II): when and by how much will we see EMBO
prices decrease?
of an Open access option for authors (EMBO Open). Also, it was announced
that the site license pricing model for the EMBO package would move to a
mixed revenue model if subscription charges and publication fees, with
compensatory measure, we do not believe that year to year fluctuations
should be "averaged out", as this would make pricing intransparent and
set a wrong market signal. If publishers like NPG/EMBO do not keep their
promise to adjust their pricing in response to increased OA uptake and
published output, we in effect have an additional revenue model, not a
For the full paper, cf.
http://www.ub.uni-stuttgart.de/ejournals/Hybrid_journal_pricing_EMBO.doc
Hybrid journal pricing (1): Impending Oxford Open price increases Bernd-Christoph Kämper <[log in to unmask]> 2009-10-20 15:06
<[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Hybrid journal pricing (1): Impending Oxford Open price increases
Comments: To: [log in to unmask]
Hybrid journal pricing (1): Impending Oxford Open price increases
You are satisfied that Oxford University Press takes the mixed revenue
model for their hybrid Oxford Open program seriously and reduces prices
for e-only site licenses for some of their journals in response to
Oxford Open, the hybrid journal program of OUP, carefully designed as a
controlled experiment and case study [1-4], continues to evolve and
adjust its pricing model.
OUP promises to (and actually does) adjust the e-only price for its
hybrid journals in order to "reflect the amount of open access versus
non-open access content published within each journal" during the last
completed year when setting its annual prices, and this has resulted in
It may be instructive to compare prices for the journal with the largest
OA uptake, Bioinformatics. From 2005 to 2010, online only price changed
that INMPRC's 10 year sponsorship grant for eCAM (which helped to start
the journal in 2004) has ended which seems strange (requests by this
author to both the editor in chief and the managing editor to confirm
articles will be published as standard articles, available to
subscribers of the journal. However, the journal will participate in the
Oxford Open program, and authors may choose to pay the Oxford Open
For the latter, access is subscription based, if authors do not opt in
to pay for OA. Apparently they do, because the journal is nearly 100% OA
(almost all articles carry a cc-by-nc license, and the two reviews (3%)
of the rest is being paid for by author charges. We do not know whether
any library actually pays for the online version - as this journal is
97% open access and 100% free access, there is no need to do so except
Since its inception, in addition OUP has used an incentive to keep
libraries subscribing to these hybrid journals by offering a lower
author publication charge for corresponding authors based at
institutions with a full price online subscription to the journal. At
the same time this helped to make the Oxford Open option more attractive
the Oxford Open initiative by maintaining your online subscriptions to
give your researchers who wish to publish in the journal in question the
option of paying reduced author charges, should they choose to have
I did not see this effect mentioned in the various articles outlining
the prospects for pricing within the Oxford Open program, but it now
becomes quite obvious.
pay for open access to their paper would come from institutions that
also hold a subscription to the journal in question, also because the
full open access charge might seem prohibitive to many authors. For the
Oxford Open Journal with the highest OA uptake, Bioinformatics, this is
indeed the case. In 2006, 87% of authors choosing the Open access option
from Print OUP has certainly been successful so far. They are also one
of the few hybrid publishers who actually make adjustments to their
hybrid journals depending on OA uptake, and carefully document the
progress of their experiments in OA publishing. However, based on our
and those who are going to save are institutions that do not publish in
a particular Oxford Open journal they subscribe to (or, paradoxically,
those who choose not to publish OA via the golden route, as long as they
as those described above (or perhaps this is just another facette of
their carefully designed longterm experiment with hybrid OA models).
Whether this will not throw back OA uptake for 2010 remains to be seen.
[8] Kate Stringer, Oxford Journals open access pricing adjustments,
posted to liblicense-l, Sun, 12 Aug 2007 15:28:30 EDT,
cf. also comment by Peter Suber on an earlier liblicense-l announcement,
Oxford reduces prices on 28 hybrid journals
http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/2007/07/oxford-reduces-prices-on-26-hybrid.html
[12] Martin Richardson: Oxford Journals makes a change to its pricing
policy,
[13] Oxford Open Pricing. New charges -- for all papers accepted on or
after 1 December 2009,



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