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Date: Sun, 24 Jan 1999 13:47:45 +1100
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Subject: What people are saying about this book
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************WHAT  PEOPLE  ARE  SAYING  ABOUT  THIS  BOOK************

ECOFEMINISM  AS  POLITICS: nature, Marx and the postmodern
by Ariel Salleh,
London: Zed Books, 1997 and New York: St Martins Press, 1998;
pp.208; index; ISBN 1-85649-400-4 (paper).


"A nascent political economy", "a unique and powerful explanatory
position":
UK political scientist John Barry, editor of the Green Politics
Newsletter
writing in Environmental Politics, Autumn 1998.

"I place Ariel Salleh's scholarship in the front rank with work of
socialist
ecofeminists such as Vandana Shiva or ecofeminists generally like
Rosemary
Ruether and Susan Griffin":
USA philosopher Max Oelschlaeger, editor of Postmodern Environmental
Ethics
and author of Caring for Creation.

"The book engaged me - it is passionately written, well researched and
sweeping in theoretical scope...there is something refreshing about
Salleh's
inclusionary politics":
USA feminist Betsy Hartmann, author of Reproductive Rights and Wrongs
writing in The Women's Review of Books, October 1998.


Ariel Salleh's book Ecofeminism as Politics: nature, Marx and the
postmodern
does what we all need to do in these times - integrate our thinking
about
Ecological, Social Justice, Feminist, and Indigenous concerns. An
exemplar
of complexity theory, her political synthesis is developed as an
embodied
materialism. Salleh judges the libidinal economy of contemporary
politics,
sexuality, and science to be born of denial and thus blindly destructive
or
inconsequential.

The author's lateral reasoning carries us through globalisation and
Green
ideologies, gendered science and gene technology, aboriginal land
rights,
the population debate, and critical reflections on neo-liberalism and on

Marx's theory of value. The book has been adopted in environmental
studies,
history and philosophy of science, ethics, politics, sociology, cultural
and
women's studies. Social movement researchers will find here a useful
broad
brush history of a popular globalising resurgence.

In the search for sustainable futures, Salleh's grassroots alternative
goes
global, building shared ground for women and men, North and South. Her
class analysis invites us to democratise our theoretical models by
learning
from the reproductive labour skills and insights of meta-industrial
workers -
housewives, peasants, indigenous peoples. Honouring usually invisible
ways of knowing nature, she finds the precautionary principle already
practised by this global majority, whose labours minimise risk,
reconcile
differences, and hold complex living - social and ecological - systems
together.

Ecofeminism as Politics is designed to destabilise the eurocentric
denial that
separates mind from body, Humanity from Nature. An activist and
sociologist
of knowledge, the author uses passion, playful irony and forceful trans-

disciplinary argument to interrogate fixed assumptions and to re-embody
economic thinking within bio-energetic fields. Salleh grounds
ecofeminist
political awareness in the painful material contradiction of living as
both
human self and natural resource. And this phenomenology of exploitation
and bifurcation in her epistemic standpoint silences criticism of
ecofeminism
as an essentialist position.


Dr Ariel Salleh's gender critiques are published in New Left Review,
Environ-
mental Politics, Science as Culture, Economic and Political Weekly,
Hypatia,
Environmental Ethics, and Social Alternatives. She teaches in Social
Inquiry
at the University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury; was Visiting Professor
of Women's Studies at St Scholastica, Manila in 1998; and visiting
fellow in
Environmental Conservation Education at New York University, 1992.

ORDERS
Zed Books, 7 Cynthia Street, London N1 9JF   UK
             Tel   44-171-837-4014 [log in to unmask]
St Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010   USA
             Tel   1-212-982-3900 [log in to unmask]
Astam Books, 57 John Street, Leichardt, NSW 2040   Australia
             Tel   61-2-9566-4400 [log in to unmask]

********************************************************************************



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<HTML>
************<B>WHAT&nbsp; PEOPLE&nbsp; ARE&nbsp; SAYING&nbsp; ABOUT&nbsp;
THIS&nbsp; BOOK</B>************

<P><FONT COLOR="#CC0000">ECOFEMINISM&nbsp; AS&nbsp; POLITICS: nature, Marx
and the postmodern</FONT>
<BR>by Ariel Salleh,
<BR>London: Zed Books, 1997 and New York: St Martins Press, 1998;
<BR>pp.208; index; ISBN 1-85649-400-4 (paper).
<BR>&nbsp;

<P><FONT COLOR="#009900">"A nascent political economy", "a unique and powerful
explanatory position":</FONT>
<BR>UK political scientist John Barry, editor of the Green Politics Newsletter
<BR>writing in Environmental Politics, Autumn 1998.

<P><FONT COLOR="#009900">"I place Ariel Salleh's scholarship in the front
rank with work of socialist</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR="#009900">ecofeminists such as Vandana Shiva or ecofeminists
generally like Rosemary</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR="#009900">Ruether and Susan Griffin":</FONT>
<BR>USA philosopher Max Oelschlaeger, editor of Postmodern Environmental
Ethics
<BR>and author of Caring for Creation.

<P><FONT COLOR="#009900">"The book engaged me - it is passionately written,
well researched and</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR="#009900">sweeping in theoretical scope...there is something
refreshing about Salleh's</FONT>
<BR><FONT COLOR="#009900">inclusionary politics":</FONT>
<BR>USA feminist Betsy Hartmann, author of Reproductive Rights and Wrongs
<BR>writing in The Women's Review of Books, October 1998.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Ariel Salleh's book<FONT COLOR="#CC0000"> Ecofeminism as Politics: nature,
Marx and the postmodern</FONT>
<BR>does what we all need to do in these times - integrate our thinking
about
<BR>Ecological, Social Justice, Feminist, and Indigenous concerns. An exemplar
<BR>of complexity theory, her political synthesis is developed as an embodied
<BR>materialism. Salleh judges the libidinal economy of contemporary politics,
<BR>sexuality, and science to be born of denial and thus blindly destructive
or
<BR>inconsequential.

<P>The author's lateral reasoning carries us through globalisation and
Green
<BR>ideologies, gendered science and gene technology, aboriginal land rights,
<BR>the population debate, and critical reflections on neo-liberalism and
on
<BR>Marx's theory of value. The book has been adopted in environmental
studies,
<BR>history and philosophy of science, ethics, politics, sociology, cultural
and
<BR>women's studies. Social movement researchers will find here a useful
broad
<BR>brush history of a popular globalising resurgence.

<P>In the search for sustainable futures, Salleh's grassroots alternative
goes
<BR>global, building shared ground for women and men, North and South.
Her
<BR>class analysis invites us to democratise our theoretical models by
learning
<BR>from the reproductive labour skills and insights of meta-industrial
workers -
<BR>housewives, peasants, indigenous peoples. Honouring usually invisible
<BR>ways of knowing nature, she finds the precautionary principle already
<BR>practised by this global majority, whose labours minimise risk, reconcile
<BR>differences, and hold complex living - social and ecological - systems
<BR>together.

<P>Ecofeminism as Politics is designed to destabilise the eurocentric denial
that
<BR>separates mind from body, Humanity from Nature. An activist and sociologist
<BR>of knowledge, the author uses passion, playful irony and forceful trans-
<BR>disciplinary argument to interrogate fixed assumptions and to re-embody
<BR>economic thinking within bio-energetic fields. Salleh grounds ecofeminist
<BR>political awareness in the painful material contradiction of living
as both
<BR>human self and natural resource. And this phenomenology of exploitation
<BR>and bifurcation in her epistemic standpoint silences criticism of ecofeminism
<BR>as an essentialist position.
<BR>&nbsp;

<P>Dr Ariel Salleh's gender critiques are published in New Left Review,
Environ-
<BR>mental Politics, Science as Culture, Economic and Political Weekly,
Hypatia,
<BR>Environmental Ethics, and Social Alternatives. She teaches in Social
Inquiry
<BR>at the University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury; was Visiting Professor
<BR>of Women's Studies at St Scholastica, Manila in 1998; and visiting
fellow in
<BR>Environmental Conservation Education at New York University, 1992.

<P><FONT COLOR="#CC0000">ORDERS&nbsp;</FONT>
<BR>Zed Books, 7 Cynthia Street, London N1 9JF&nbsp;&nbsp; UK
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Tel&nbsp;&nbsp; 44-171-837-4014 [log in to unmask]
<BR>St Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010&nbsp;&nbsp;
USA
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Tel&nbsp;&nbsp; 1-212-982-3900 [log in to unmask]
<BR>Astam Books, 57 John Street, Leichardt, NSW 2040&nbsp;&nbsp; Australia
<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Tel&nbsp;&nbsp; 61-2-9566-4400 [log in to unmask]

<P>********************************************************************************
<BR>&nbsp;</HTML>

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