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On Thu, 5 Sep 1996 08:52:12 -0400 (EDT)  John Carmi Parsons wrote:

> Regarding the feast of St Fiacre--the French word "fiacre" came to refer (by 
> the 18th century anyway) to a type of carriage that was often run for hire 
> in Paris.  
[snip, snip]

My German dictionary has it as "Fiaker", so presumably it was 
imported into the German-speaking countries as a result of the 
widespread use of French in polite society (under Frederick the Great, 
perhaps?).  Perhaps Otfried could enlighten us....

Mark Harris
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Mark Harris
S-mail: Finance Division, University of London, Room 255, Senate 
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"The reason of a thing is not to bee inquired after till you are
sure the thing it selfe bee soe.  Wee comonly are att *What's
the reason of it?* before wee are sure of the thing."

                           John Selden (1584-1654), _Table Talk_      


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