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*Apologies for cross-posting*


*Book launch: ‘Work that Body: Male Bodies in Digital Culture' – Jamie
Hakim*
Friday, 5th December, 6pm, C309, Tait Building, City University,
Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB
Organised by The Gender and Sexualities Research Centre
<https://www.city.ac.uk/about/schools/arts-social-sciences/sociology/the-gender-and-sexualities-research-centre>
and
the University of East Anglia's School of Art, Media and American Studies

More details + registration here:
https://www.city.ac.uk/events/2019/december/book-launch-work-that-body-male-bodies-in-digital-culture
<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.city.ac.uk%2Fevents%2F2019%2Fdecember%2Fbook-launch-work-that-body-male-bodies-in-digital-culture&data=02%7C01%7Cj.hakim%40uea.ac.uk%7C9ad930fefb0345a42ebe08d76cf90023%7Cc65f8795ba3d43518a070865e5d8f090%7C0%7C0%7C637097689031180420&sdata=qEthcJpEda2J5PmLEt6PuGOMMt8qhrPU78qeZH2l8fs%3D&reserved=0>

*Work That Body* (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019) explores how male bodies have
been represented by, constructed in, and experienced through digital media
during the age of austerity. Analysing examples including muscular bodies
on social media, the mediation of chemsex and celebrity nudity, it finds
that on the one hand digital media has enabled men to transform their
bodies into tools of value-creation in an historical context in which their
traditional breadwinning capacities have been diminished. On the other, it
has allowed them to use their bodies to form intimate collective bonds
during a moment when competitive individualism continues to be insisted on
as the privileged mode of being in the world. More information here
<https://www.rowmaninternational.com/book/work_that_body/3-156-01609b17-0875-482b-af39-572ae47e013a>
.

Join the author Jamie Hakim and respondents Helen Wood (Lancaster), Stephen
Maddison (Brighton) and Catherine Rottenberg (Nottingham) as they discuss
masculinity and digital media in the age of austerity.

About the speakers:

Jamie Hakim worked at *Attitude* magazine from 2003 before becoming an
academic, and is now Lecturer in Media Studies at the University of East
Anglia. He is Principal Investigator of the ESRC-funded project 'Digital
Intimacies: how gay and bisexual men use their smartphones to negotiate
their cultures of intimacy' which is partnered with the Terrance Higgins
Trust. *Work That Body* is his first book.

Catherine Rottenberg is Associate Professor in American and Canadian
Studies at the University of Nottingham. Her book *The Rise of Neoliberal
Feminism* was published by Oxford University Press in 2018.

Stephen Maddison is Professor and Head of the School of Humanities at the
University of Brighton and the author of *Fags, Hags and Queer Sisters:
Gender Dissent and Heterosocial Bonds in Gay Culture* (Macmillan).

Helen Wood is Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at Lancaster
University. Her work on gender, class and inequality includes the book *Talking
with Television *(Illinois) and the recent article ‘The Malaguf Girl: a
public sex scandal and the digital class relations of social contagion’.


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