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Dear all,

De Montfort University's Drama Research Group and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Dance (CIRID) warmly invite you to Borderlines VII: Performing through the Unknown, an interdisciplinary conference to be held on Thursday the 20th June. See below for the programme, a link to a map of the DMU campus, and details of our keynote speaker, Sarah Gorman, Reader in the Department of Drama, Theatre & Performance at Roehampton University, London.

To book a (free) place and for further information, please contact Alissa Clarke ([log in to unmask]<https://webmail-ic.dmu.ac.uk/owa/redir.aspx?C=8cp-qCMrfUytuSIurBgAtVQlVfVIidMIQynVZDrcy5Tc76L_moSLOUGfTIsOi0GJIL3aZANjz1k.&URL=mailto%3aa.clarke%40dmu.ac.uk>)

Warm wishes,
Alissa

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DMUborderlines/
Twitter/ Instagram: @DMU_Borderlines<https://twitter.com/DMU_Borderlines>



Borderlines VII: Performing through the Unknown

De Montfort University, Thursday 20th June 2019, 8.45 – 19.45

Location: PACE Building

8.45 – 9.15               Arrival and registration (PACE Ground Floor and entrance)

Tea and coffee in ‘The Diner of Absolute Regrets’, PACE 1 (Ground Floor)
Nick Kilby (DMU) with performers, Riva Styx (The Inhuman League) & Rola Croft (Hallam Hellcats)

 View the display by DMU’s special collections in the PACE entrance

Witness Are you Everybody? (Film, Lala Meredith-Vula, DMU; Music, John Young, DMU) and It’s Sophie! (Film, Sophie Swoffer, DMU) in PACE 2, break out space (First Floor)

9.15 – 9.20               Welcome (PACE 2, First Floor): Alissa Clarke – Senior Lecturer in Drama, Borderlines Conference Chair

9.20 – 11.10             Panel 1: Absence, Presence and National Identities (PACE 2, First Floor)
Chair: Rob Brannen

Part a: Fear, Social Change and National Identities

‘Playwrights and Plays – When History Repeats Itself’
Lyndsey Bakewell (DMU)

‘Kingston's Charter Day Pageant: Neither a beanfeast nor wayzgoose, but "an act of local patriotism"’
Adam Ainsworth (DMU)

10 – 10.15               Discussion of Part a

Part b: Absence, Presence and Trauma



‘Border Poetics in the Dead Zone: Where Even the Ghosts have Died’
Alev Adil (Arkin University of the Creative Arts and Design)



‘Fear, Absence and the Un/moving that Moves: Stillness, Graffiti, and Sculpture in the Aftermath of 9/11’
Lisa Wilson (Wolverhampton/ Coventry)

10.55 – 11.10           Discussion of Part b

11.10 – 11.30           Break
Tea and coffee in the ‘The Diner of Absolute Regrets’, PACE 1, Ground Floor
Nick Kilby (DMU) with performers, Riva Styx (The Inhuman League) & Rola Croft (Hallam Hellcats)

                                View the display by DMU’s special collections in the PACE entrance

Witness Are you Everybody? (Film, Lala Meredith-Vula, DMU; Music, John Young, DMU) and It’s Sophie! (Film, Sophie Swoffer, DMU) in PACE 2, break out space, First Floor

11.30 – 12.50          Panel 2: Feminist Stories and Aftermaths (PACE 2, First Floor)
Chair: Ellen Wright


‘Whispers, Footsteps and Broken Glass: The Re-Imagining of Ruth Ellis in Audio-Noir’
Kate Chapman (DMU)

‘Revisiting the Royal Court Theatre’s Fraught and Fruitful years, 1968-1975’
Sue Healy (Lincoln / Portsmouth)

‘Somatic Selves: A Phenomenological Approach within Painting to a Group of Women Experiencing Somatic Symptoms, Disorders and Stress- Related Disorders’
Stefania Laccu (DMU)


12.50 – 13.50          Performative lunch in ‘The Diner of Absolute Regrets’, in PACE 1, Ground Floor with Black Angeles Field Trip [... and all I got was this crappy t-shirt]
Nick Kilby (DMU) with performers, Riva Styx (The Inhuman League) & Rola Croft (Hallam Hellcats)


13.50 – 14.50          Keynote – ‘“You Can Say Much More Interesting Things about a Scar, than You Can About a Wound” – Selina Thompson’s salt. as an act of Radical Softness’ (PACE 2, First Floor)
Sarah Gorman (Roehampton)

14.50 – 15.50           Panel 3, Postgraduate Panel: Conflict, Violence and Aftermath
                                 (PACE 4, Third Floor and PACE 2, First Floor)
 Chairs: Kieran Sellars and Kerryn Wise

PACE 4                    Vinigger Strokes
Aundre Goddard (DMU)

PACE 2                    'Haptic Understandings of Place: Tania El Khoury’s Gardens Speak’
Olivia Lamont (Royal Holloway)


PACE 2                   'Black Angeles Field Trip [... and all I got was this crappy t-shirt]: Q+A’
 Nick Kilby

15.50 – 16.10            Break
  Tea and coffee in the ‘The Diner of Absolute Regrets’, PACE 1, Ground Floor
  Nick Kilby (DMU) with performers, Riva Styx (The Inhuman League) & Rola Croft (Hallam Hellcats)

   View the display by DMU’s special collections in the PACE entrance

  Witness Are you Everybody? (Film, Lala Meredith-Vula, DMU; Music, John Young, DMU) and It’s Sophie! (Film, Sophie Swoffer, DMU) in PACE 2, break out
  space, First Floor.

16.10 – 17.05            Panel 4: Messy, Transgressive Potentialities (PACE 2, First Floor)
  Chair: Kelly Jordan

  ‘‘Aftermaths of Performance: Artists who Make “an awful mess”’’
  Harriet Curtis (DMU)


  ‘De(con)structing the Mimetic Form: Violence and Transgression’
  Silvia Dumitriu (RCSSD)

17.05 – 17.15            Comfort break / changeover

17.15 – 18.35            Panel 5: Exploring the Unknown through Multiple Ways of Knowing (PACE 2, First Floor)
  Chair: Ramsay Burt

 ‘“Debora”: Crossing African Storytelling / Contemporary Theatre (2)’
 ‘Funmi Adewole (DMU)

  ‘No-How Generating’
  Matthias Sperling (DMU)

  ‘On “signalling – at the molecular level”’
   Monika Jaeckel (Westminster) with dancers, Giulia Lurza (Independent Dance Artist) and Paola Drela (Independent Dance Artist) and performing with two INTUERI e-textile pieces by Gabriela Guasti Rocha (interface design FH Potsdam, Germany)

18.35 – 18.45            Closing Remarks (PACE 2, First Floor)
                                  Ramsay Burt

18.45 – 19.45             Book launch, wine and refreshments reception on the PACE Mezzanine (Third Floor)
                                   Book launch – Intermedial Theatre: Principles and Practice (Macmillan International), edited by Mark Crossley (DMU)

                                   You may also wish to take this last opportunity to:

    View the display by DMU’s special collections in the PACE entrance

    Witness Are you Everybody? (Film, Lala Meredith-Vula, DMU; Music, John Young, DMU) and It’s Sophie! (Film, Sophie Swoffer, DMU) in PACE 2, break out
    space, First Floor

20.00                           Dinner - Shivalli Restaurant, Welford Road (payment required)




Sarah Gorman is a Reader in the Department of Drama, Theatre & Performance at Roehampton University, London. Her research focuses on Contemporary Feminist performance and European/North American experimental theatre and Live Art.

She is currently working on a book project for Routledge provisionally entitled Women in Performance: Repurposing Failure. She co-edited a special edition of Contemporary Theatre Review on Contemporary Feminist Theatre and Performance with Geraldine Harris and Jen Harvie (released September 2017) and is developing a series of ‘Performance Dialogues’ to document interviews held with female experimental performance makers such as Karen Christopher, Rachael Young, Lauren Barri Holstein, Selina Thompson and Lois Weaver.

Her monograph The Theatre of Richard Maxwell and the New York City Players was published by Routledge in 2011 and she has contributed numerous reviews, articles and chapters to publications such as: Feminist Review, Performance Research, Contemporary Theatre Review, New Theatre Quarterly, AngloFiles, Western European Stages and Studies in Theatre and Performance. Her Reading as a Woman blog can be found at http://readingasawoman.wordpress.com.

‘“You Can Say Much More Interesting Things about a Scar, than You Can About a Wound” – Selina Thompson’s salt. as an act of Radical Softness’
As part of its 2019 Spring season Brighton’s Marlborough Theatre advertised a programme of ‘Radical Softness’. Around the same time South London Gallery advertised a Black Women’s reading group organized around Audre Lorde’s statement, ‘Self-Care [is] an Act of Warfare.’ Self-care and the idea of ‘radical softness’ have acquired a newfound urgency in 2019 informing both academic and populist articles about the relationship between resilience, self-care and the neoliberal imperative for each citizen to take responsibility for their mental and physical wellbeing. In an epilogue to Burst of Light, a collection of essays about her experience of living with liver cancer, Lorde wrote, ‘caring for myself … is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare (Lorde 2009: 130). ‘Self care as warfare’ or ‘radical softness’ represents a potent example of the radical practices being employed by artists to process trauma and push back against societal pressure to achieve and maintain optimum fitness for work. I will interrogate salt. from the perspective of an artist using performance as a process of reconciliation after having experienced trauma and/or mental distress. In this paper I will argue that Selina Thompson’s 2016 performance, salt. represents a radical act of ‘self care’ whilst resisting populist neoliberal formulations. Within salt. Thompson articulates her attempts to ‘push back’ against European racism and invites the audience to ‘sit with’ the homicide of the Transatlantic slave trade. I will argue that this performance represents a crucial invitation for audiences to contemplate how chattel slavery has informed their own lives and that the alternative ‘soft’ power structures proposed by Lorde push back against neoliberal models of self-care.

Selina Thompson is a Birmingham based artist working across a range of media. Her work explores themes of identity, white middle-class privilege, race and gender. She interrogates what it means to live as part of the African diaspora in contemporary Britain. In Race Cards, (2015) her installation comprising of 1000 questions about race, she asks difficult and self-deprecating questions such as: ‘How do you go about exposing white supremacy in liberal arts spaces?’ ‘Why is Morrissey so racist? Why do I love him anyway? ‘and ‘What does it tell me about perceived notions of black womanhood, if we are framing being happy as a radical act?’ In May 2019 salt. will play at the Royal Court, London for two weeks. salt. relates Thompson’s experience of tracing the route of the Transatlantic slave triangle. In 2015 she travelled from Belgium to Ghana, Jamaica and the US experiencing extremes of immense joy and sadness as she considers the plight of her ancestors, revels in the fecundity of Jamaica and pushes back against racist attitudes that persist today. Thompson’s interview with Sarah Gorman can be found at https://readingasawoman.wordpress.com/2017/08/15/you-can-say-much-more-interesting-things-about-a-scar-than-you-can-about-a-wound-interview-with-selina-thompson/
********************

DMU Campus Map: https://www.dmu.ac.uk/documents/study-documents/undergraduate-study-documents/visit-us/dmu-campus-map-december-2016.pdf




Dr Alissa Clarke
Senior Lecturer in Drama Studies
Director of the Drama Research Group
Institute Head of Research Students (Drama, Dance and Performance Studies)
School of Visual and Performing Arts, De Montfort University
Rm 2.18, Clephan Building,
The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH

0116 2078953 / [log in to unmask]
www.dmu.ac.uk/alissaclarke<http://www.dmu.ac.uk/alissaclarke>

Latest publication:
“Am I Providing a Good Show for you?:”Female Performance, Labor and Collaborative Agency in Niki de Saint Phalle and Peter Whitehead's
Daddy (1973), Feminist Media Histories, Vol 5, Issue 2,
Spring 2019; (148-180):
http://fmh.ucpress.edu/content/5/2/148

Please email me to book an appointment for a learning support and feedback session.


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