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When refugee and internally displaced children return home, they rarely return to the life they used to know. Instead, children return to societies that are not sufficiently resourced to support them, or where their rights, as accorded by the UNCRC, cannot be realised. In response to soaring numbers of displaced worldwide  68.5 million, of which more than half are children  in a context that promotes returns over other alternatives such as resettlement and local integration, and building on a previous Afghanistan-focused collaboration, Save the Children and Samuel Hall release a new global returns report: Achieving Durable Solutions for Returnee Children ( https://resourcecentre.savethechildren.net/node/15157/pdf/mdi_global_returns_full_report_final.pdf )

Drawing on the best currently available data, the report offers the first comparative child-focused analyses of conditions on return across four priority returns contexts: Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, and Syria, seeking to understand what these mean for reintegration. From these findings, we offer a series of recommendations that we hope will expand our collective knowledge and improve standards of programming, policy, and advocacy in support of child returnees and their families.

The report is a step forward to answering two fundamental questions: 1) how do we guarantee minimum standards for safe and dignified returns? 2) How can we measure the extent to which children have successfully reintegrated into their communities?

To learn more about child returns to Afghanistan, read our previous report From Europe to Afghanistan: experience of child returnees ( http://samuelhall.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/SC-From_Europe_to_Afghanistan-screen-1610.pdf ), which collects the voices and experiences of 57 child returnees and their families.

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