medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Another possibility, is that the local authorities were reactions to decrees of general councils, esp. Lateran IV. But not just rubber stamping them. C. R. Cheney is good on how decrees were adapted & then recycled. If you spent a lot of time turning the pages of Mansi's Sacrorum conciliorum or of Concilia Germaniae, you find a lot of rote repetition or minor adaptation. Did these bishops and their clergy simple feel obligated to restate thelaw? A compilation like Lyndwood's Provinciale presents a more selective  approach, but still on standard topics, most not concerned with topics like sodomy.


Manuals for confessors may reveal more of particilar concerns. Visitation records often show who was suspected of what offense, butthey often concerned adultery or fornication, where they get away from reporting the state of church, manse and cemetery.


Tom Izbicki


From: medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Paul Chandler <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2018 6:14:57 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [M-R] Legislation as evidence
 
medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
There seems to be a presumption, or perhaps it is a hermeneutical principle, that repeated prohibitions of certain behaviour indicate that the behaviour in question is an ongoing problem. So, for example, if the legislation of a religious institution repeatedly provides punishments for homosexual behaviour or the possession of private property, it is safe to conclude that homosexual activity or private wealth are common misbehaviours in that institution or in that period. 

I'm wondering if a particular author or authors proposed this interpretation? Ot is it simply a common-sense assumption? Could anyone direct me to relevant bibliography? 

Do you think there is any merit in an alternative explanation that such legislation may be not so much -- or not only -- a response to recurring offences but an expression of fears and anxieties. In other words, that such legislation might have a character that is more deterrent than reactive? In the above cases could it be an expression of homophobia, or anxieties about inequality, as much as clear evidence of infringements? Is there bibliography along these lines?

Just wondering. I'd be most grateful if anyone has any comments. -- Paul Chandler



--
Paul Chandler, O.Carm.
Holy Spirit Seminary  |  PO Box 18 (487 Earnshaw Road)  |  Banyo Qld 4014  |  Australia
office: (07) 3267 4804  |  mobile: 044 882 4996
[log in to unmask] 
********************************************************************** To join the list, send the message: subscribe medieval-religion YOUR NAME to: [log in to unmask] To send a message to the list, address it to: [log in to unmask] To leave the list, send the message: unsubscribe medieval-religion to: [log in to unmask] In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to: [log in to unmask] For further information, visit our web site: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/medieval-religion
********************************************************************** To join the list, send the message: subscribe medieval-religion YOUR NAME to: [log in to unmask] To send a message to the list, address it to: [log in to unmask] To leave the list, send the message: unsubscribe medieval-religion to: [log in to unmask] In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to: [log in to unmask] For further information, visit our web site: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/medieval-religion