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A couple points on this question, but sorry no answer. I’d be interested in responses too. 

Minimum angle deviation paths are also distance minimising so the question of what people are optimising must remain open. Topological simplest paths (fewest axial lines) might be thought of as reducing decisions and so reducing cognitive load in some way, if only in terms of the need to remember a route. 

Sent from my iPhone

On 24 Jul 2018, at 07:00, Subik Shrestha <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

Hi there,

You might find the following paper or the references in the paper to be helpful in this regard (although the paper is not about the human brain's way of navigating):


Thanks,
Subik

On Mon, Jul 23, 2018 at 8:56 PM SUBSCRIBE SPACESYNTAX Anonymous <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
Hi Space syntax community,

Thank you for being actively involved in academic discussion on space syntax. I do have one question on which hope you could please help. I’d be thankful to have your answer on this question supported by academic evidence. The question is:

- As says in space syntax, over time people tend to have “least angular deviations” when traverse between destinations. This is because they wanna unintentionally “minimaise their brain navigation processing”. And, this is again because “least angular deviation” can produce “cognitively simplest journeys”.  Now my question is do we have academic evidence (either lab-based or in a free condition) that a pattern with least angular deviation is cognitively easier for brain navigation? (I understand Kevin Lynch’s work may be cited on this; but I’m after more robust new evidence).

Thanks,

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