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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Besides the ubiquity of paintings and sometimes HUGE sculptures of St Christopher, usually just inside the public doorways of medieval churches, which certainly suggest a belief in the apotropaic value of looking at images of St Christopher, there are also many woodcuts surviving from the 15th century, some of which are accompanied by a prayer.  One of the earliest, the so-called Buxheim St Christopher, dated (perhaps mistakenly) 1423, has the prayer "Cristofori faciem quacumque tueris / Illa nempe die morte mala non morieris" which can be translated as "Whenever you look at the face of Christopher, in truth, you will not die a terrible (or bad) death that day"

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:The_Buxheim_Saint_Christopher_1423

Cheers,

Jim


From: medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Ms B M Cook <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: July 24, 2018 10:24:22 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [M-R] Michael and Rafael
 
medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
This may be a bit tangental, but I am reminded of the belief that if you have looked upon the face of Saint Christopher that day you will not die UNSHRIVEN. This is why the wall paintings of Saint Christopher are often to the found on the wall opposite the west door of a church which could be left open to reassure passers-by. (This is why Saint C is the patron of travellers. Dying on a journey was an occupational hazard – could happen to anyone. Dying UNSHRIVEN was serious. So you begin each day’s journey going to Mass and looking at Saint C and hopefull all will be OK.
 
Am I simply regurgitating 19th C fantasy, or is this a serious contribution? You tell me!!
 
Brenda M C
 
From: [log in to unmask]" href="mailto:[log in to unmask]"> Cormack, Margaret Jean
Sent: Monday, July 23, 2018 6:45 PM
To: [log in to unmask]" href="mailto:[log in to unmask]"> [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [M-R] Michael and Rafael
 
medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
I just ran across a prayer that appears in an 18th century ms. but seems to have much older contents (I have yet to chase down the details about the manuscript.) Anyway, a lengthy prayer against enemies, physical or spiritual, ends with  the following:
'First thing in the morning have the Angel Michael in your mind, and you will have a good day. If you meet your enemy, have the angel Raphael in your memory and mind.' 
Does anyone know of medieval texts that might contain similar ideas?
Meg

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