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I showed them to my wife, who does woodcuts, but she had never seen anything like these.

Crispin


> On 13 Feb 2018, at 13:28, Gemma Henderson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> This is an email sent via the SHCG List. If you reply to this message, your message will be sent to all the people on the list, not just the author of this message. -------------------------------
> I thought so at first too, or perhaps an etching tool of some kind, but I thought the blades looked too flimsy for this kind of work?
>  
> Gemma 
>  
> From: Social History Curators Group email list [mailto:[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] On Behalf Of Rachel Silverson
> Sent: 13 February 2018 12:46
> To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: research help
>  
> This is an email sent via the SHCG List. If you reply to this message, your message will be sent to all the people on the list, not just the author of this message. -------------------------------
>  
> Could these be used for engraving wood?
>  
> Wood engraving is a relief printing process known for its small scale and fine line work. An engraving is made by cutting an image into the polished end-grain of a hardwood block. To take a print from the block, ink is rolled evenly on the surface of the block, paper is placed on top, and pressure is applied with a press, or by rubbing by hand with a burnisher. The cuts that were made into the wood do not receive any ink and come out as white, the surface of the block prints as black, and the image is reversed. The tools that are used to engrave the block resemble those used by a metal engraver.
> 
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> Rachel Silverson MA, AMA
> Museum Curator
> Firing Line
> Museum of The Queen’s Dragoon Guards and The Royal Welsh
> The Interpretation Centre
> Cardiff Castle
> Castle Street
> Cardiff
> CF10 3RB
> Tel: 029 2078 8598
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> Please visit our website at http://www.cardiffcastlemuseum.org.uk <http://www.cardiffcastlemuseum.org.uk/>
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>  
> From: Social History Curators Group email list [mailto:[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] On Behalf Of Gemma Henderson
> Sent: 13 February 2018 12:36
> To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: FW: research help
>  
> This is an email sent via the SHCG List. If you reply to this message, your message will be sent to all the people on the list, not just the author of this message. -------------------------------
> Hi all,
>  
> We’ve been asked to help identify these implements. They are made by a company specialising in “Scientific and photography” materials and the enquirer suspects the may have been used to make parallel lines on photographs or negatives so that text could be added in a uniform way. He also points out that the numbers on them correspond roughly to font sizes. Is anyone able to help?
>  
> Best wishes
>  
> Gemma
> Gemma Henderson | Curator - History | Museums and Galleries | City of Edinburgh Council | Museum of Edinburgh | 142 Canongate | Edinburgh EH8 8DD | (: +44 (0) 131 558 9161| * : [log in to unmask] <blocked::mailto:[log in to unmask]> | www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk <blocked::http://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/> |  @EdinCulture
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>  
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>  
> From: David Rintoul [mailto:[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>] 
> Sent: 09 February 2018 15:57
> To: Museums & Galleries <[log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
> Subject: research help
>  
> Greetings
>  
> Someone suggested that I might be able to find answers to some questions here, or, if not, some advice on the next place to turn. I live in Kansas, but have Scottish ancestry. I have visited your fine country (and some of your museums), and hope to do so again in the future
> I got a note in Facebook messenger from a friend who used to live in KS but now lives in the Pensacola FL area. She said that she had obtained, in a batch of stuff from a Scottish auction, a little wooden box with some "unusual tools". An inscription inside the box said "This is the property of D.R. Rintoul". That’s my name. Not my middle initial, but a fine name nonetheless! I don't know the relationship of this person to me, but my great-grandfather (also named David Rintoul) emigrated to the USA from the Kinross region in the 19th century, so I suspect we are related. The box was made by the A.H. Baird Company in Edinburgh. A.H. Baird, according to what I can find on the internet, was "... a scientific instrument maker and chemical dealer from about 1889 to the 1940's. ... In the late 1880's Baird began carrying photographic supplies. In early advertisements he used the phrase "everything scientific" but in 1889 he published an ad that claimed "everything photographic".
> It's hard to imagine the marvelous coincidence of all that (I am also a scientist and a photographer!). It's almost enough to make you believe in conspiracy theories (but not quite!). She graciously sent me the box and tools, and I will attach some images. In one of them a US quarter-dollar coin is included for scale; that coin’s diameter is approximately 24 mm (0.95 inches)
> Hopefully someone can tell me, or point me toward another possible source of expertise. What are these tools for?
> Here's what I know. They have tiny, almost illegible, numbers on the ends of the wooden sticks, ranging from 4 (the tiniest one) through 20. These are mostly even numbers, although one of them is 17. The tips of #s <https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/s?source=feed_text&story_id=10104683378908091> 17, 18 and 20 can be seen in one of the images below. The other sticks without tips must be for replacing the sticks on the tools, implying that they might regularly be broken (?). Some of the sticks are round, as you can see, but most are flat and tapered at one or both ends.
> I can't come up with any photographic use for these things, but photography was definitely different back in those days. I am inclined to think that they are scientific instruments of some sort, dating from the earlier days of the Baird Company, but that is just a guess. I’d appreciate it if someone on your staff can take a look at these images and let me know their thoughts!
>  
> Thanks in advance
>  
> Dave
>  
> David A. Rintoul, Ph.D.
> Emeritus Faculty
> Biology Division - Kansas State University
> Manhattan KS 66506
> ICBM: 39.1926N, 96.5842W
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> The SHCG list is provided for members of Social History Curators Group to discuss subjects relevant to social history in museums. To join SHCG visit www.shcg.org.uk <http://www.shcg.org.uk/> . Opinions expressed in this email are the responsibility of the author and are not necessarily shared by SHCG. To leave the list do not reply to this message but send an email to [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> with a blank subject line and these words as the body of the email: SIGNOFF SHCG-LIST
> The SHCG list is provided for members of Social History Curators Group to discuss subjects relevant to social history in museums. To join SHCG visit www.shcg.org.uk <http://www.shcg.org.uk/> . Opinions expressed in this email are the responsibility of the author and are not necessarily shared by SHCG. To leave the list do not reply to this message but send an email to [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> with a blank subject line and these words as the body of the email: SIGNOFF SHCG-LIST


The SHCG list is provided for members of Social History Curators Group to discuss subjects relevant to social history in museums. To join SHCG visit www.shcg.org.uk . Opinions expressed in this email are the responsibility of the author and are not necessarily shared by SHCG. To leave the list do not reply to this message but send an email to [log in to unmask] with a blank subject line and these words as the body of the email: SIGNOFF SHCG-LIST