medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
Hi Rosemary, Marco

The van Weerbeke musical setting is scheduled for this evening's rehearsal, so was very much at the front of my brain yet, as noted, the lightbulb was a bit tardy in showing signs of life.

The text of "Anima Christi" has indeed been attributed to Pope John XXII, who attached an indulgence to it in 1330. The Harley 2253 text is dated c.1340 on the basis that it states the conditions for the indulgence.

However, the text was also for some time attributed to St Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556) on the grounds that he cited it a lot in the "Spiritual Exercises". It's clearly not by him, but then also begs the question of attributing authorship to a pope on the grounds that he attached an indulgence to it...

The paper I mentioned attributes its authorship to Aegidius Romanus, a pupil of Aquinas who, of course, collated (and probably also authored a fair chunk of) the liturgy for the feast of Corpus Christi. Unfortunately there are no citations in the paper to support this attribution or the assertion that it predates 1315. Romanus was an Augustinian, but his teacher was, of course, a Dominican...

Cheers

Rob





From: Rosemary Hayes-Milligan and Andrew Milligan <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Wednesday, 31 January 2018, 17:41
Subject: Re: [M-R] Bathing into The Blood of Christ

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture 
Dear Rob
 
I wondered why it was nagging at the back of my brain and now realise that it was the imagery produced by the 'modern' (19th century) translation of Anima Christi that is still the hymn most likely to get a Catholic congregation singing properly.  In hymn books I have seen, it has been attributed to John XXII (pope 1316-34) - but I do not know how accurately?  For those who do not know it, the words most frequently sung (in the UK at least) are as follows:
 
Soul of my Savior sanctify my breast,
Body of Christ, be thou my saving guest,
Blood of my Savior, bathe me in thy tide,
wash me with waters gushing [think we tend to sing 'flowing'] from thy side
.

Strength and protection may thy passion be,
O blessed Jesus, hear and answer me;
deep in thy wounds, Lord, hide and shelter me,
so shall I never, never part from thee.

Guard and defend me from the foe malign,
in death's dread moments make me only thine;
call me and bid me come to thee on high
where I may praise thee with thy saints for ay. (Edward Caswell's translation)
 
Best,
Rosemary Hayes
----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask]" ymailto="mailto:[log in to unmask]" target="_blank" href="mailto:[log in to unmask]" title-off="">Rob Durk
To: [log in to unmask]" ymailto="mailto:[log in to unmask]" target="_blank" href="mailto:[log in to unmask]" title-off="">[log in to unmask]
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 8:56 PM
Subject: Re: [M-R] Bathing into The Blood of Christ

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
Hi Marco

Apologies for being late into the fray!

My general ambit is musical and liturgical but, having edited the music of Gaspar van Weerbeke's (c.1445-1516+) "Anima Christi" (only a few weeks back), I did spot this thread only the lightbulb took a little time to come on.... not an account, but a devotional text, so slightly off your main topic but I suspect worth visiting for context.

Earliest surviving text is Lbl Harley 2253, c. 1340

There are a few textual variants around but no huge significance theologically.

"Sanguis Christi inebria me" gets a variety of renditions into English; "inebriate" is an obvious one, but the most widely used English translation runs "Blood of my Saviour, bathe me in thy tide", 'inebria' having also the meaning 'saturate, drench' (per Whitaker's Words).

That, with the following line, "Aqua lateris Christi, lava me," - "Wash me with water flowing from thy side" I think definitely pulls this text into your research basket.

The van Weerbeke setting was printed in 1503 in Venice but my gut feeling is that it dates back to his mid 1470s period in Milan. So a slightly variant text to Harley 2253 was available to him.

There's an interesting paper on the connection between the text and Dominican thought on academia.edu:

Cheers

Rob










From: "Marco Piana, Mr" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Sunday, 28 January 2018, 18:03
Subject: [M-R] Bathing into The Blood of Christ

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
Dear all,
 
My name is Marco Piana, and I am a Ph.D. student at McGill University, Montreal. During the last months, I have been working on an article on blood devotion in early modern Italy. One of my case studies involves a vision/prophecy where people convert to Christianity by bathing into the blood of Christ. I was wondering if it is a consistent topos in medieval Christianity, and if so, if you ever encountered a similar case.
 
Thank you very much in advance!
 
All the best,
 
Marco
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