I'm bemused by the term 'visually impaired'. My vision impaired friends often joke that they "don't look so bad as to be described as a visual impairment". Maybe this author needs to amend her terminology.

Janice

Sent from my phone


From: The Disability-Research Discussion List <[log in to unmask]> on behalf of Beth Omansky <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 9:47:14 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
 
I agree with Kim.  We ought to be putting pressure on publishers.  Even when a publisher offers Ebooks, it's not a guarantee the 3rd party platform will be accessible.  As authors, we ought to make sure our publishers will offer Ebook or accessible PDFs before we sign our contracts.
 
BTW, Bookshare is not free to everyone in the U.S.  If you're not a student somewhere, it costs $50 per year.
 
Beth
 
*******************
ďThe more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.Ē   Mark Twain
 *****************
Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
Portland, OR
USA
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.

According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.

Kim Steele

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To: [log in to unmask]

Iím not being defensive. Iím neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesnít help non-USA people. 

You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. Itís not perfect but you also canít complain about free books. 

Iím actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services. 


Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
University of California Berkeley

From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
 
Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who canít read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that youíre in Australia, so it doesnít help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought youíd want to know.
>
> Still doesnít excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ĎBlindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a Ďread out loudí feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/                 
>>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

________________End of message________________
This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
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________________End of message________________
This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
 
*******************
ďThe more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.Ē   Mark Twain
 *****************
Beth Omansky, Ph.D.
Portland, OR
USA
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Kim Steele <[log in to unmask]>
To: DISABILITY-RESEARCH <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 2:11 pm
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing

Unfortunately, authors have little say over the price a particular publisher sets for their books. If they did, most would make them very reasonable so more people could access them.

According to the author, it appears that Cambridge University Press will be making some attempt at increasing accessibility for VIP via Adobe eBook. It seems that rather than castigating the author, it may make more sense to target publishers.

Kim Steele

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
From: Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Wed, December 06, 2017 1:44 pm
To: [log in to unmask]

Iím not being defensive. Iím neither the author nor the publisher. I just wanted to point out that at least in the USA, books through book share are free for what they call  print impaired users. I know it doesnít help non-USA people. 

You might want to encourage your own national governments to either fund or set up their own system like Bookshare where books in accessible formats are free to blind/VI/print impaired users. Itís not perfect but you also canít complain about free books. 

Iím actually worried as the USA federal government may defund Bookshare along with other BVI services. 


Karen Nakamura (she/her/hers)
Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair in Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology
Graduate advisor, UCB-UCSF Joint Program in Medical Anthropology
University of California Berkeley

From: Pamela <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 1:27:01 PM
To: Karen Nakamura
Cc: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: New book, Blindness and Writing
 
Your defensive statements do not hold water. The book should be accessible. Accessibility does not mean disable people must make extrea effort

the non-disabled people do not have to make. Your service is discriminatory, no matter who accepts your behaviour, or where it is enacted.

Dr Pamela Waugh
> On 7 Dec 2017, at 8:20 am, Karen Nakamura <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> At least in the USA, this title and many others are available through BookShare, which an initiative of the US Department of Education and operated by Benetech. It makes many books including academic titles, available for print-impaired persons (which includes not just blind and visually impaired, but folks who are dyslexic, those who canít read because of other processing disabilities, physical disabilities, migraines, etc.).
>
> https://www.bookshare.org/browse/book/1802287
>
> I know this is a UK mailing list and that youíre in Australia, so it doesnít help; but if there are list members in the USA, I thought youíd want to know.
>
> Still doesnít excuse the high price of the book.
>
> Karen
>
>
>> On Dec 6, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Pamela <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> This book is of particular interest to me, as a visionimpaired author, but Iwill not be reading or buying it.
>>
>> I will not read it because it is advertised only in hard copy, and i will not scan it. It should be available
>>
>> in an electronic format. Secondly, I will not buy it because it is advertised at the price of AUD 155.
>>
>> The presentation of your book makes me wonder if you have any experience either as an author or as a vision-impaired persom (VIP).
>>
>> You must/should know the a minute percentage of VIPs are blind or sightless. Sightlessness is most people's
>>
>> assumption of blindness, so behave as if their assumption is correct. If you have researched disabled people's history, you must know that
>>
>> their stance is 'Nothing about us without us.'
>>
>> I hope the marketing of your book markedly improves.
>>
>> Dr Pamela Waugh
>>
>> Canberra Australia
>>
>>
>>> On 7 Dec 2017, at 2:12 am, Heather Tilley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>> Dear Colleagues,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm pleased to send notice of my book ĎBlindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing' which has just been published in hardback by Cambridge University Press (ISBN 9781107194212).
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the book I examine the huge shifts that took place in the experience and conceptualisation of blindness during the nineteenth century. Considering the ways in which visually-impaired people used texts to shape their own identities, I argue that blindness was also a means by which writers reflected on crafting literary form. The book:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> o     - Offers revisionary readings of nineteenth-century canonical authors
>>>
>>> o     - Extends understandings of disabled and embodied identity
>>>
>>> o     - Presents a range of under-researched archival material relating to the history of disability
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> For more information please visit www.cambridge.org/9781107194212
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> The book will also be made available in accessible format to all the institutions who participate in the RNIB's Bookshare programme. Cambridge University Press are also working on having a special version of the Adobe eBook produced with a Ďread out loudí feature which will be made available for sale on their website when ready.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>>
>>> Heather
>>>
>>> (Please note I am on maternity leave until the end of May 2018 so it may take me a little while to respond to any queries).
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Dr Heather Tilley
>>> Birkbeck Wellcome Trust ISSF Fellow
>>> Department of English and Humanities
>>> Birkbeck, University of London
>>> 43 Gordon Square
>>> London WC1H 0PD
>>>
>>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>>> Staff profile: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-staff/full-time-academic-staff/heather-tilley
>>> Projects: http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/touchingthebook/                 
>>>                https://victorianpsychologynow.wordpress.com/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________End of message________________
>>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>>
>>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>>
>>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>>
>>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>>
>>
>> ________________End of message________________
>> This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
>>
>> Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
>>
>> Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
>>
>> You can VIEW, POST, JOIN and LEAVE the list by logging in to this web page.
>>
>

________________End of message________________
This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
Enquiries about list administration should be sent to [log in to unmask]
Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
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________________End of message________________
This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).
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Archives and tools are located at: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/disability-research.html
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This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

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This Disability-Research Discussion list is managed by the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Leeds (www.leeds.ac.uk/disability-studies).

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