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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

I can add a four more James images: his beheading on the Stavelot altar, 
a C13 limestone figure from Spain, a molded glass cameo in Cleveland, 
and a C14 ivory in Indianapolis.
www.KornbluthPhoto.com/Saints3.html
rows 3-4
Cheers,
Genevra

On 7/25/2016 3:18 AM, John Dillon wrote:
> medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
>
> James (d. ca. 42) and his brother John, the sons of Zebedee, were Galilean fisherman along with Simon Peter.  They are prominent in gospel accounts of Jesus' ministry and always come early in lists of the Twelve Apostles.  According to Acts 12:1-2, James was martyred on the orders of Herod Agrippa I (reigned, 41-44).  The legend that he had evangelized parts of Spain is at least as old as the seventh century.  In the early ninth century James' sepulchre was "discovered" in Galicia at what is now Santiago de Compostela.  As is evidenced by its mention in the martyrology of Florus of Lyon (808-830), word of this event spread quickly.  By the tenth century people from abroad were making pilgrimages to his shrine and James was on his way to becoming a patron saint of pilgrims.  He is frequently represented in art with a pilgrim's hat and staff, often too with the seashell that was the special badge of those returning from Compostela.
>
> In Latin-rite churches and in others whose sanctoral calendars have been influenced by those of the Roman Rite today (25. July) is James' feast day.  Byzantine-rite churches celebrate him on 30. April.
>

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