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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
Thanks for all replies.  I'll stick with provost then!  Nesli's reply is interesting as it's certainly not the case in Padua, where some quite minor churches were 'prepositure'. The local 17thC historian Portenari links prepositure, priorati, and oratorie in his list of churches that fall outside his established categories (which mainly consist of churches and monasteries). [ https://archive.org/stream/dellafelicitdi00port#page/n0/mode/2up]  I'm clearly wrong in assuming that all 'prepositure' were privately-founded/owned, but the one I'm working on was in that category and was outside diocesan jurisdiction. I assume the other prepositure that Portenari lists were also somehow outside the Bishop's remit, but I haven't checked this. The title 'provost' certainly implies a clerical community, so maybe the term 'prepositura' could be attached to a large collegiate church (as at S. Stefano in Prato) or a small one.


Laura

Dr. Laura Jacobus
Senior Lecturer in History of Art
Birkbeck College, University of London

 
For details of my book on Giotto and the Arena Chapel see http://www.brepols.net/Pages/ShowProduct.aspx?prod_id=IS-9781905375127-1

On 5 November 2015 at 15:58, Neslihan Senocak <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

I work on the Italian prepositura for my forthcoming book on care of souls in medieval Italy. The term is really used to designate some of the great churches that did not have cathedral status (regardless of how they are founded). The main church of Prato, S. Stefano, in Italy was a prepositura, hence the top-priest there was called prepositus. I personally leave it as it is in English, since "prevost" or "provost" has an academic ring to me, but nothing wrong with translating it as provost. 

Best,

Nesli


Neslihan Senocak
Associate Professor of History (Medieval Europe)
Columbia University









On Nov 5, 2015, at 10:14 AM, Laura Jacobus <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
Piggy-backing onto Meg's query, has anyone any good suggestions for how to translate 'preposito'?  It's the term used for the head priest of a 'prepositura', and as I understand it that's a clerical community in  a privately-founded institution.  I've been using 'provost' but am open to better suggestions.

Laura

Dr. Laura Jacobus
Senior Lecturer in History of Art
Birkbeck College, University of London

 
For details of my book on Giotto and the Arena Chapel see http://www.brepols.net/Pages/ShowProduct.aspx?prod_id=IS-9781905375127-1

On 5 November 2015 at 14:38, Neslihan Senocak <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Hi,

Yes, archpriest is the highest dignity in most of the Italian cathedrals. Not so much a translation, but the office duties seem to correspond to those of the "dean" in the English and Norman cathedrals.

Best,

Nesli

Neslihan Senocak
Associate Professor of History (Medieval Europe)
Columbia University









On Nov 5, 2015, at 9:17 AM, "Cormack, Margaret Jean" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
>
> Greetings all,
> I´m wondering if there is a good English translation for the term 'archpriest' who in the case I am interested in appears to be the 'head' priest at a cathedral?
> Meg
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