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Kostas wroe;
>If all the geological stratigraphy we see is the result of alluvial, fluvial, glacial and other natural processes, how could such stratigraphy apply to archeology? Since human habitation and artifacts can only happen in the open at ground level. And if these are found deeply buried, that would suggest to me subsequent catastrophic geological processes at work which do not respect the workings of people. And would indiscriminately bury these from various different places and times.<

NO, NO, NO, Kostas. If you can't get your head round the fact that an archaeological 'layer' or 'context' is different from a geological 'stratum' I suggest you go away and take an evening class in introductory archaeology - if they have such a thing in your part of the world. Then come back and we can discuss it. In the meantime, please don't keep trying to teach your grandparents to suck eggs - General Pitt-Rivers knew more about scientific archaeological methods in the 1880s than you do now.

John Clark