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{Warning - possible TMI alert}

Having backpacked on a shoestring budget in India, I learned first hand 
(as it were) about avoiding the left hand. Actually, it's duties were 
not as offensive as one might suppose. I think squatting over a hole in 
the ground/floor leaves one's body less soiled to begin with, and then 
one rinses with water - a more refreshing practice than using toilet paper.

That was thirty years ago. I still automatically shove my left hand 
under the table in Indian restaurants.

Eve
On 20-Oct-2015 8:23 AM, Carol Primrose wrote:
> There is a well-known and widespread taboo on the left hand for that 
> reason. I used to do seminars on working with overseas students and 
> library staff complained about how rude students were in refusing to 
> accept anything from the left hand. I had to point out that actually 
> as far as the student was concerned it was the staff member who was 
> being rude. Rather similar to showing the soles of your feet to Arabs.
> Carol
>
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Dave Tooke
> Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2015 12:21 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [BRITARCH] Help me: Old English crude language
>
> Fair enough, but what about Scouts?
>
> Or has the left handed handshake used to demonstrate trust vanished?
>
> Dave Tooke
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On 20 Oct 2015, at 10:15, John Clark <[log in to unmask]> 
> wrote:
>
>>> Needless to say, it reinforced her unwillingness to shake hands with 
>>> anyone
>> using anything other than the right hand...<
>>
>> The advice as I recall it was 'Never shake hands with a left-handed 
>> Armenian beggar.'
>>
>> John 
>
>
> ---
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