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Hi Paula 

 

Having transferred them to microfilm, do you then destroy the paper records?
I would be interested to know what others do here as I have heard lots of
stories about transferring paper records to digital or film but 

still keeping the paper. 

 

Thanks

 

Lindsey

 

From: [log in to unmask] [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf
Of Paula Highton
Sent: 12 January 2015 11:26
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [OCC-HEALTH] FW: Destruction of Occupational Health records

 

Because of the issues surrounding Asbestos and other substances hazardous to
health we don't destroy any of our records. We do however transfer them to
microfilm.

 

Regards

 

Paula

 

From: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Lynda Wright
Sent: 12 January 2015 10:34
To: [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]> 
Subject: [OCC-HEALTH] FW: Destruction of Occupational Health records

 

 

 

 

I would appreciate your advice. And this is a warning to those who have not
sorted out their Occupational Health  records with a retention and
destruction policy. My employer has almost 40 years of records to sort out.
There is an element of organisation but so the total picture is not quite as
bad as it sounds. . 

 

Do we have a legal obligation to keep records for 10 years as the BMA
suggests? Do we have a legal obligation to keep them at all after the
employee has left employment? Why do they have to be kept for so long  when
storage space, the cost and management may put them as risk especially when
a department is outsourced and outsourced so to speak going from company to
company. ? Where will COSHH records etc be in 40 years time? The NHS
guidance advised  3 years for Occupational Health  records and in the past
our  solicitors stated 6 years to cover possible litigation of basic
Occupational Health  records. Do new providers want all the old records or
to start again and not have access to current employees records? 

 

The problem now is enormous. We have almost 60,00 plus records many of which
will be COSHH etc to sort out in one area and they will need approximately
400 boxes at 50 records per box plus all the recording. We will need
approximately another 100 boxes for the rest of the records. What if there
is no money to pay for the storage and how can we guarantee their future
safety if a provider goes bust so to speak. There are approximately another
50 boxes stored by a previous provider. The HSE is overloaded. 

 

Would the safest thing to destroy them all now which is what they would like
to do! 

 

I feel it would in the long run be better to scan the COSHH etc records into
a secure system because of long term cost but what then? Will future IT
systems be able to deal with them?

 

Any ideas?

 

All advice would be appreciated

 

Lynda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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