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Many archaeological sites seem to have that special reverence until the day
that they are 'found out' and become popularised. It is the price we have
to pay to promote the public's interest and support for funding.
Fortunately there are still out if the way sites that hold their magic.
On 11 Nov 2014 12:22, "Catherine Petts" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Yes, I too visited Stonehenge by bus in the 1950s. I was about 14 and a
> friend and I caught a bus from Marlborough for a day out in  Salisbury The
> bus went past Stonehenge and we  broke the outward journey to visit it. On
> the way back we went past Stonehenge as it was nearly dark and back lit by
> the last of the sunset. I was so inspired I went home and wrote a poem
> about Stonehenge that got published in my school magazine! My visit was in
> February and my friend and I had the site entirely to ourselves. No visit
> since has ever lived up to that first visit. Like almost every other
> historic site Stonehenge  is now over-interpreted and over explained.
>
> I recently visited the Roman fort at Richborough. It remains unreformed.
> All it had was about a dozen interpretive boards at key places that
> explained the context of what was in front of you. I learnt and understood
> more in a short visit there, and felt more at ease in this historic
> landscape than I have felt at any historic site for a long time..
>
> --------------------------------------------------
> From: "John Clark" <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 2014 11:17 AM
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: [BRITARCH] not the tunnel debate again!!
>
>  Gill Alderman wrote:
>>
>>> Stonehenge was accessible by bus in the 1940s and '50s.,
>>>
>>
>> I remember a 1950s bus ride from Salisbury to Amesbury, then a long walk
>> up that dreadful main road - perhaps there was a direct bus that didn't run
>> very often? But it was worth it to be able to walk among the stones.
>>
>