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Catching up, but really enjoyed reading this thread of the discussion!

Just to complicate things, Thomas Metzinger seems relevant:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFjY1fAcESs

Jack

On Mar 24, 2014, at 6:04 PM, Sarah Thompson <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Hi G.H. and list
> 
> Barbara wrote;
> 
>> So, in a way, I think that the human might equate to a sense of self, but only as long as it is recognized that the sensing of self is not a subjective >vague idea, but an actual material process constantly occuring out there in the populous world.
> 
>> Puns, and maybe code itself, give us a clue to computability and expressivity and their linkage.
> 
> that's exactly what I mean... bloody hell. We're not even presumed to have a sense of self any more de facto. Well thanks. I'm sure I can't think why some people think 'I'm not a me I'm just part of the populous world', meanwhile back at the clinic...
> 
> maybe what you say does relate to the fleshly reality of me and not-me after all. I think it's all of those things, and we should consider the self as important to mental health
> 
> ta
> Sarah
> 
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> On Mar 23, 2014, at 10:55 AM, <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> Hi Barbara
>> 
>> I've read your post a couple of times and am not clear how you arrived at your extrapolated speculation as stated:
>> 
>> <I speculate that when we are presented with a pun, we *feel* the disequilibrium of the non-human, i.e., we feel our cognitive processes as autonomous from our sense of self>
>> 
>> Do you mean to imply that 'our' cognitive process are somehow capable as being 'felt' as 'non-human'? Can you perhaps expand on this?
>> 
>> Do you also mean to imply that 'human' equates to 'a sense of self'?.
>> 
>> With many thanks
>> 
>> B
>> Sent from my BlackBerry smartphone from Virgin Media
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From:         Barbara Lattanzi <[log in to unmask]>
>> Sender:       "Curating digital art - www.crumbweb.org" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Date:         Sun, 23 Mar 2014 10:26:48
>> To: <[log in to unmask]>
>> Reply-To:     Barbara Lattanzi <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] Fwd: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] on interpreters  and compilers
>> 
>> Fork-bomb is a thing of beauty but it is not a pun.  Here is a pun (at least it is in US english)...
>> 
>> A duck walks into a drugstore and says, "Give me a chapstick and put it on my bill."
>> 
>> It is a pun for two reasons:
>> 
>> 1.  It requires cross-referencing at least two unrelated lexicons of meaning.
>> 
>> 2.  It triggers in the brain something analogous to the computational "halting problem"...an uncomputability as to actionable meaning.
>> 
>> With forkbomb, the ultimate result is measurable quantifiably (its "extensive" property of running as many times as it can).
>> 
>> With the pun, the result is not quantifiable, but an "intensive" quality that can only exist at a bifurcation point of meaning.  (Hamlet had a similar "intensive" problem).
>> 
>> A pun presents an intensive problem of meaning to solve.  But the "solution" is an endless oscillation, until a choice is made between lexicons, based on an immanent context.
>> 
>> The Deleuze/DeLanda example of the material expressivity of the halting problem is the formation of a soap bubble...i.e., a thin soap film that, when presented with different air pressure on either side of its surface which has reached a critical intensity, must compute and "make a decision" as to whether/when to reach the equilibrium of a sphere.
>> 
>> Extrapolating, I speculate that when we are presented with a pun, we *feel* the disequilibrium of the non-human, i.e., we feel our cognitive processes as autonomous from our sense of self. These cognitive processes have their own ways of dealing with the halting problem...oscillating for the sheer pleasure of it, and as the late Hollis Frampton said, doing so "whether we pay them any mind or not."
>> 
>> Puns are every bit as computational as fork-bombs, but not the same thing.
>> 
>> Barbara
>> 
>> 
>> ---------
>> Barbara Lattanzi
>> Associate Professor of Interactive Arts
>> School of Art and Design
>> NYSCC at Alfred University
>> Alfred, NY USA
>> 
>> vimeo.com/idiomorphics/videos
>> wildernesspuppets.net
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Mar 23, 2014, at 7:41 AM, "D. Neal McDonald" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>>> That is the first  tattoo I've been tempted by in a while. Shades of
>>> Obfuscated C! Unix is a pile of puns and grammar jokes like this. Laft-brain
>>> puns. As it were.
>>> 
>>> Siri strikes me as something that could do scripting puns in a more
>>> right-brain manner, like when that Scot asked for a sandwitch and she told him
>>> she didn't know where to get pajamas. Programming languages are short on
>>> verbs.
>>> 
>>> -Neal
>>> 
>>>> I have a deep and long running affection for programming puns. I'm sure most
>>>> people will be aware of Jaromil's fork bomb
>>>> http://jaromil.dyne.org/journal/forkbomb_art.html
>>>> 
>>>> The elegance of this one seems like the direct opposite of other kinds of
>>>> programming word play (such as the ones Rob mentions below). The commonality
>>>> though is in the way that they sort of duck in and out of being about
>>>> performative action (as in being computational) and being a formal game.
>>>> 
>>>> Begin forwarded message:
>>>> 
>>>> From: Rob Myers <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
>>>> Subject: Re: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] on interpreters and compilers
>>>> Date: 22 March 2014 22:36:47 GMT
>>>> To:
>>>> <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>
>>>> Reply-To: Rob Myers <[log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>>