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Vince,

Also known as 'Jack by the hedge' (Garlic Mustard (Brassicaceae)) in North 
Devon. We use it regularly...

Many, many field mushrooms about at present - collected 5 lbs of then 
yesterday and shared with neighbours - delicious!

Use your leave to tramp the fields and have a scrumptious meal - we used the 
in an omelette this morning for brekky.

Trev


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Vince Russett" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2013 4:11 PM
Subject: [BRITARCH] Prehistoric spices


>I don't usually post when on leave, but this one caught my eye.
>
> The fact people used garlic mustard seeds (Alliaria petiolata) to flavour
> food seems to come as a shock to some.
>
> http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130823-prehistoric-hunter-gatherers-garlic-mustard-spices/
>
> (from Explorator)
>
> Jack by the hedge (as it's known in Somerset) was gathered as a wild food
> in the spring in the 1950s (my gran taught me to identify it), and good it
> is, too. It does wilt a bit quickly, but wrapping it in a damp cloth 
> helps.
> The seeds are slightly peppery, and in a time when English people were
> frightened of spices, I loved them, especially with pork (or oddly, cooked
> tomatoes). I feel privileged to have been brought up in a time when people
> hadn't quite forgotten their hedgecraft.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130823-prehistoric-hunter-gatherers-garlic-mustard-spices/