All,

I would like to add to the list of economics journals mentioned.

Journal of Regional Science (e.g. Irwin, 2010 and another in press)
Regional Science and Urban Economics (Magliocca et al., 2011)

However, as Leigh mentioned, these exceptions just reinforce the difficulties ABMs are facing in penetrating mainstream econ. Thanks for getting this list going, Edmund, very helpful and interesting!

Nick

On Mon, Dec 19, 2011 at 2:02 PM, Leigh Tesfatsion <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
19 December 2011

Edmund ---

RE: Disciplinary Penetration (Economics)

Agent-based modeling is far from having penetrated mainstream economics in any routine way.

However, papers stressing Agent-Based Computational Economics (ACE) are now rather regularly appearing in the following well-regarded but specialized ("field") economic journals:

  Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control
  Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization

Papers stressing ACE have occasionally appeared in the following "premier" economic journals:

  American Economic Review (e.g., Holland/Miller, LeBaron/Tesfatsion)
  Journal of Monetary Economics (e.g., work on GAs by Jasmina Arifovic et al.)
  Journal of Political Economy (e.g., work on GAs by Jasmina Arifovic et al.)

A volume dedicated to ACE appeared in 2006 in the prestigious Handbooks in Economics Series published by Elsevier.

     Leigh Tesfatsion and Kenneth L. Judd, ed. (2006). /Handbook of Computational Economics/, v. 2.,
     Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Description <http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.cws_home/660847/description#description> & and chapter-preview links. <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=PublicationURL&_hubEid=1-s2.0-S1574002105X02003&_cid=273377&_pubType=HS&_auth=y&_acct=C000228598&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=e4757b4f65755ed6340a11fee9615200>

Articles favorably recommending agent-based modeling tools for economics (particularly macroeconomics in the wake of the still ongoing financial crisis) have appeared in

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences   ( Agent-based modeling: Methods and techniques <http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/99/suppl_3/7280>
for simulating human systems <http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/99/suppl_3/7280>. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_National_Academy_of_Sciences>. May 14, 2002. )

    Nature  (  J. Doyne Farmer andDuncan Foley, Duncan (2009), 'The economy needs agent-based modelling.
    ' Nature, Vol. 460, No. 7256. (05 August 2009), pp. 685-686,and Mark Buchanan (2009), 'Meltdown modelling. <http://pagesperso-orange.fr/mark.buchanan/nature_economic_modelling.pdf>
Could agent-based computer models prevent another financial crisis? <http://pagesperso-orange.fr/mark.buchanan/nature_economic_modelling.pdf>.' Nature, Vol. 460, No. 7256.
    (05 August 2009), pp. 680-682. )

    The Economist ( "Agents of change" <http://www.economist.com/node/16636121>. /The Economist/. 22 July 2010)

A rather comprehensive survey of ACE published work is forthcoming in the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control -- see the following:
-------------------------------------

    http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/ACEHistoricalSurvey.SHCheng2011.pdf

    Shu-Heng Chen, *"Varieties of Agents in Agent-Based Computational Economics:
     A Historical and an Interdisciplinary Perspective"* <http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/ACEHistoricalSurvey.SHCheng2011.pdf>/Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control/,
     2011, to appear. */

    Abstract:/* This thoughtful and comprehensive study traces the origins of agent-based computational economics (ACE) through four different gateways: namely, study of market processes; study of cellular automata with fixed rules of behavior; evolution-of-cooperation tournaments with programmed strategies; and experiments with autonomous human-like agents (artificial life).

--------------------------------------

See, also, the listings of annotated pointers to published ACE work at the following sites:

  ACE: Introductory Materials
  http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/aintro.htm

  ACE: Research Area Sites
  http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/aapplic.htm

  ACE Research Area: Agent-Based Macroeconomics
  http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/amulmark.htm

Best wishes,

Leigh



2011/12/19 Edmund Chattoe-Brown <[log in to unmask]fm <mailto:edmundchattoebrown@fastmail.fm>>

   Dear All,

   What are the highest status/best known/most cited journals which have
   published ABM/social simulation in your particular social
   science? (And
   what are the citations?) In Sociology the highest impact journals
   give,
   for the set of search terms <agent based model simulation> the
   following
   numbers of "hits" (excluding book reviews, editorials and "front/back
   matter"):

   American Journal of Sociology   17 (most in one special issue)
   American Sociological Review    11
   British Journal of Sociology    3
   Annual Review of Sociology      23
   Global Networks – A Journal of Transnational Affairs    4
   Sociology of Health & Illness    3
   Journal of Marriage and the Family 1
   Economy and Society     49
   Social Networks 37
   Social Problems 3

   However, scanning these quickly, I suspect that many (most?) are
   false
   positives as it is quite hard to pick a set of search terms that
   uniquely identify what we do. (Could we find an unusual word and
   always
   use it in our papers to help with this!) Looking more carefully
   at some
   of the cases with fewer hits, two of the three BJS articles are false
   positives (the other written by yours truly*), the only example in
   Journal of Marriage and the Family is a FP and so on. (I would
   have done
   more of this but the library computer seems to be acting up.)

   I wonder if one thing we could do to promote our research is
   simply to
   try and get something into journals that haven't had it before
   ... Would
   anyone else like to share this kind of analysis for economics,
   management, psychology, criminology, demography? (Who else is there
   reading?)

   Happy Xmas!

   Edmund

   * Chattoe, Edmund (2006) 'Using Simulation to Develop and Test
   Functionalist Explanations: A Case Study of Dynamic Church
   Membership',
   British Journal of Sociology, 57(3), September, pp. 379-397.

   --
    Edmund Chattoe-Brown
   [log in to unmask]
   <mailto:edmundchattoebrown@fastmail.fm>


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--
Professor Leigh Tesfatsion     Email: [log in to unmask]
Department of Economics        FAX: 515-294-0221
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa 50011-1070
www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi