Print

Print


I think the item you mention was on The Onion website. With due 
humility, might I mention 'The Library of Babel' chapter in John 
Schofield's *Defining Moments* (Archaeopress 2009). Also 'Excavating 
Second Life Cyber-Archaeologies, Heritage and Virtual Communities' 
Rodney Harrison, *Journal of Material Culture* Vol. 14, No. 1, 75-106 
(2009). there is some other stuff....

Paul G-B

On 02/07/2010 08:38, Yvonne Aburrow wrote:
> Hi,
>
> The message about website closures made me think of The Wayback Machine http://www.archive.org/web/web.php as you will still be able to access them there once they have gone (though of course they won't be updated any more).
>
> Some time back, I think someone posted the humorous item about the internet archaeologists of the near future discovering the ruins of the Friendster civilisation, complete with abandoned profiles. The same could have been said of Geocities.
>
> So, could you have an archaeology of the internet? How would you go about it? I guess you could chart the rise and fall of various websites, and how they over-reached themselves in the quest for users (Geocities), or added too many new features (Facebook). This process might be analogous to the rise and fall of empires (Roman, Byzantine, Sasanian...)
>
> cheers
> Yvonne
>
> http://archaeopagans.blogspot.com
>
>