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Hi,
     The latest version is 2.5, included from FSL 4.1.3 onwards.

Many Regards

Matthew

> Steve,
>
> Thanks for the reply.  I am pretty sure I am using the newest  
> version.  I am using Randomise version 2.1 which came with FSL  
> version 4.1.
>
> Please let me know if there is a newer version of FSL out there that  
> I do not know about.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Lindsay.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: FSL - FMRIB's Software Library [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On  
> Behalf Of Steve Smith
> Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2009 1:34 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [FSL] Randomise TFCE paired t-test biased results?
>
> Hi - the first thing I would do is install the latest version of FSL -
> you are using quite an old randomise, and the way that multiple
> covariates are handled has improved over various versions.  You won't
> need to change any of the preprocessing - just install the latest FSL
> and use the version of randomise in that.
>
> Cheers.
>
>
>
> On 25 Aug 2009, at 19:37, Lindsay Walker wrote:
>
>> I am using Randomise with the TFCE function (using version Randomise
>> version
>> 2.1) to do a paired t-test, where my two groups are the same set of
>> subjects
>> processed in two different ways.  We want to see the voxel wise
>> differences
>> between these two processing methods.  I am running this on whole
>> brain
>> anisotropy maps which have been scaled to values between 0 and
>> 1000.   I
>> used the -T option for TFCE, not the --T2, as I am interested in  
>> whole
>> brain, and did not run TBSS on my data.  I can provide my design
>> matrix if
>> that might help explain things.
>>
>> The results are somewhat concerning, in that it appears that
>> Randomise is
>> picking up on negative differences, but not positive differences.
>> In other
>> words, there are significant differences in the tfce_corrp_tstat2
>> file, but
>> none in the tfce_corrp_tstat1 file.  While qualitatively in our data
>> we see
>> some positive and some negative differences.  We are, therefore,
>> concerned
>> that the results are biased in some way.
>>
>> Has anyone else experienced anything like this?
>>
>> Lindsay Walker.
>>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Stephen M. Smith, Professor of Biomedical Engineering
> Associate Director,  Oxford University FMRIB Centre
>
> FMRIB, JR Hospital, Headington, Oxford  OX3 9DU, UK
> +44 (0) 1865 222726  (fax 222717)
> [log in to unmask]    http://www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/~steve
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
>