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Just a tag - anyone who thinks theoretical context is new(ish) should  
read Modern Artists on Art (a set book for me as an art student in the  
1960's) - http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Artists-Art-Second-Enlarged/dp/0486411915 
  - which begins with cubist documents from the early 20th century.   
There are also the artists like Cezanne, Emily Kngwarreye and Jasper  
John who actually paint their theory directly onto the canvas.

Also it's arguable that movements like conceptual, system art and Art  
Language couldn't have existed without the self-referential critical  
context that was a key component of their content.  Also Biederman is  
always one of my favourites:  http://www.charlesbiederman.net/

Best
Paul


On 10 Sep 2008, at 10:35, Simon Biggs wrote:

> Josephine may be partially right to suggest that artists working  
> with new
> media are more involved in the analysis and evaluation of their work  
> than
> conventional artists because they are engaged in constructing a  
> different
> artist/audience relationship. However, I suspect the main reason  
> they have
> been engaged in critiquing, curating and contextualising their own  
> work is
> because the conventional art world has ignored most of new media arts
> practice. As the professional critics, curators and theorists were  
> not doing
> this job then the artists had to do it themselves.
>
> This has changed somewhat when, from the early 1990ís, a small and  
> dedicated
> group of theorists and curators emerged who could carry this Oburdení.
> However, I am sure most people would agree it hasnít changed enough
> (although leafing through current mainstream arts publications like  
> Flash
> Art or Frieze I am happy new media arts is not associated with the  
> current
> Ocapitalí circus that is the mainstream art world).
>
> There is no harm done to the artists who have had to assume the
> responsibility of critiquing and evaluating their own and others  
> artwork. If
> anything it has sharpened their thinking (and improved their  
> spelling). I
> encourage all my students to be active as critical writers and  
> curators on
> arts practice, not only those working with new media but in all  
> disciplines.
> I see that as essential to being an aware artist.
>
> Regards
>
> Simon
>
>
> On 10/9/08 10:20, "Josephine Bosma" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> stand next to the work to 'explain' it seems a bit amateurish to me.
>> Only an amateur would think all art can be understood at first
>> glance. In 'traditional' art circles art works were explained and
>> contextualized by critics and curators, in catalogues, exhibition
>> papers and in newspapers. The tendency in new media art to involve
>> the artist in this process should maybe be seen in the light of an
>> increasing importance of the artist audience relationship. If the
>> artists prefer critics to be the sole opinion-makers of their works,
>> then by all means:  make the installation and then go home to read
>> the newspaper.
>
>
>
> Professor Simon Biggs
> edinburgh college of art
> [log in to unmask]
> www.eca.ac.uk
>
> [log in to unmask]
> www.littlepig.org.uk
> AIM/Skype: simonbiggsuk
>
>
> Edinburgh College of Art (eca) is a charity registered in Scotland,  
> number SC009201

====
Paul Brown - based in the UK Aug-Dec 2008
mailto:[log in to unmask] == http://www.paul-brown.com
UK Mobile +44 (0)794 104 8228 == USA fax +1 309 216 9900
Skype paul-g-brown
====
Visiting Professor - Sussex University
http://www.cogs.susx.ac.uk/ccnr/research/creativity.html
====








====
Paul Brown - based in the UK Aug-Dec 2008
mailto:[log in to unmask] == http://www.paul-brown.com
UK Mobile +44 (0)794 104 8228 == USA fax +1 309 216 9900
Skype paul-g-brown
====
Visiting Professor - Sussex University
http://www.cogs.susx.ac.uk/ccnr/research/creativity.html
====