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In a message dated 11/29/2007 2:56:44 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, [log in to unmask] writes:
In the example of the Edict of Grace the psychopathology of the children who
confessed has been described as 'attention seeking.' But seeing the
confession as almost a behavioural phenotype seems to me to be awfully
simplistic and requires much greater elaboration. I feel that one would
argue against the behaviour being exclusively 'attention seeking.'
 
        has it ever occurred to anyone, that a lot of witch like activity was
        going on? perhaps these children were grabbing an opportunity to
        cut loose of the confusing double life they were leading, one religion
        by day and another by night or on certain days.
 
        if you cross reference your studies on this, to folk and anthropology
        and probably some archaeology, you should find evidence of some
        kind of holdover pagan plus Christian heresy hybrid activity going
        on. A more multidiscipline approach would be in order here.
 
        Recently this year, a fellow I think on this egroup or on something
        that was linked to from a post here, published some research on
        East Anglian folk traditions of witchcraft and cunning practice, and
        stated that he had no recourse to witch trial originated material,
        as he didn't trust it, but strictly relied on now current local traditions.
 
        And he reluctantly, as he said, had to admit that there was a big
        similarity between the practices admitted in trials and those spoken
        of by locals into it. I think this is also a source for the Chumbley
        reconstruction of traditional (in the sense of pre Gardnerian or non
        Gardnerian) witchcraft.
 
 
        Mary Christine Erikson




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