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And all this has finally solved the mystery about what was in my 
father's toolbox - he didn't know what it was either - it was passed 
onto him from some relation. I'll have to check Orion's site to see if I 
can identify anything else of mill origin - assuming that I can find the 
originals again in the roofed area named in Estate Agents' jargon as a 
garage, where I understand that some people put cars.

John

Orion wrote:
> As Lyle has already pointed out it is a mill bill.
>   
> Here is more:
> 
> http://www.angelfire.com/journal/millrestoration/article.html
> 
> Wouldn't be surprised if you find a millstone or two at the site, or at
> least more dressing tools.
> 
> Orion
> 
> 
> 
> At 07:50 PM 10/6/2007 +0100, you wrote:
>> Dear List,
>>
>> The responses to our last 'button feature' are now on-line.
>>
>> To follow the buttons we have a real 'brain teaser' which has us all
> completely baffled! Excavated from a 19th century context, with the
> corrosion removed and the metal cleaned up, the object is in relatively good
> condition and appears to be made of steel and weighs exactly 1 kg. It has a
> named stamped on the side with individual letter stamps and reads M_ _ LAN
> underneath which is LONDON.
>> Is it possible to have a two ended chisel blade? We think not! But what
> could it have been produced for?
>> Click on the 'XML' tab on the front screen, or from the 'Quick Link Site
> Map' on the first page and follow 'WHAT IS IT' pages.
>> Trevor
>>
>> http://www.cmsmrps.org.uk - a community archaeology initiative.
>>
>>
>> -- 
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> 10:18 AM
>>
> 
>