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I know it's Friday, I know it's been a long week and I
know I shouldn't react quite as badly as I should but
I can't really let this pass. What I say now is not
the viewpoint of the National Library for Health team
based at NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement.
I have had some involvement with the resultant service
of what David relates to.

Clinical Evidence was not renewed because National
Knowledge Service wanted to create the Clinical
Knowledge Summaries Service delivered through NLH
website. This service deliver similar content to what
is offered with the BMJ publication Clinical Evidence
but with NHS influencing how we publish and deliver
the content. It was seen as a collaboration
opportunity for publishers delivering information on
best evidence specifically edited for the NHS. This
would have meant that NHS have some editorial input
into content, refocussing some material for specific
purposes. So content like Clinical Evidence as is
published would be repurposed and re-input into
different NHS based information delivery services. We
were not buying a publishers product and enabling
people to use the publisher interface only to use it -
but using the content, pulling into other services and
maybe flavouring it with NHS examples etc. BMJ were
invited to tender to this service, and most definitely
the core information base for this new service would
have been the Clinical Evidence content. BMJ declined
to tender. Far from "jumping into bed with Prodigy" -
SCHIN, who publish Prodigy, submitted a tender and won
the Clinical Knowledge Summaries contract. While it
would be fair to say that Prodigy is the basis of the
content delivered via this service and will be
throughout the contract, new content is being
developed and delivered which is substantially
different from the original Prodigy content and
influenced to be more in tune to NHS process and
guidance. By the end of the contract it will be a
different service to what Prodigy is and influenced by
the requirement of the NHS

Renewal was not offered to Clinical Evidence as a more
NHS focussed service was being offered.

Personally I think that looking at content produced by
publishers and being specifically packaged to NHS
service deliverables has to be the way forward. Not
just this list, but electronic journals specific lists
contain constant complaint about the way we are being
dictated to in subscription prices and forced down the
publisher interface line, which often makes
integration and searching across multiple resources
cumbersome and laborious. The Clinical Knowledge
Summaries service offered access to the NHS to a
publisher in return for allowing the NHS some say in
the way that publisher content is seen and re-focused
to the NHS users. All national content might well be
delivered this way in the future, but I dare so the
publishers will come kicking and screaming to the
table saying that their interface and interpretation
of what we - the customer - want is only the product
available to subscribe to. I spend a lot of my time
negotiating how we might get content and information
delivered from content providers to our NHS staff and
to be accused of lack of consistency (as I input into
NHS Knowledge Management service) does get your goat
on a Friday afternoon after a long hard week trying to
pull things together. Not everything is about just
renewing for renewing sake. Sure Clinical Evidence is
good - I don't dispute that - but we want to do more
than pay up for content and not be able to deliver it
the way our customer requires it and needs it to
develop.

Map of Medicine and BMJ Publishing are two commercial
enterprises and are free to enter into agreements.
Interestingly enough, the press release only states
that "BMJ Groupís Knowledge team of clinical and
scientific editors will provide a continuous evidence
surveillance service for Map of Medicine pathways,
based on identification and critical appraisal of
emerging research and systematic reviews, new
international guidelines, and drug safety alerts." It
doesn't actually say that Clinical Evidence is being
provided to Map of Medicine.

Any enough of this Friday evening moaning. It's June,
it's raining and I'm really glad I'm not in
Glastonbury...

Regards

Andy Richardson
Digital Library Service Manager
National Library for Health



> Surely, at the least it proves a lack of consistency
> at the highest
> echelons of the NHS Knowledge Management service. As
> on the one hand
> they do not renew the subscription to Clinical
> Evidence for the NLH, but
> decide to jump into bed with the Prodigy system and
> on the other hand
> the team behind Map of Medicine, which is "slowly"
> being cascaded across
> the country, have branded BMJ Clinical Evidence as
> the "Gold Standard".
> So its good enough for MoM, but obviously not for
> the NLH!
> 
>  
> 
> Regards
> 
>  
> 
> David Law
> 
> Library & Information Services Manager
> 
> Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust
> 
> Tel 01902 695322
> 
> e-mail:  <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> [log in to unmask]
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>   _____  
> 
> From: UK medical/ health care library community /
> information workers
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
> Sent: 22 June 2007 13:37
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: BMJ Group press release: New
> partnership delivers ? gold
> standard' evidence at the point of care
> 
>  
> 
> So why has NHS in England not renewed sub. to
> Clinical Evidence?
> 
>  
> 
> Or have I missed something?
> 
>  
> 
> Brenda
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> Library and Knowledge Services Manager
> 
> Healthcare Library, Mailpoint 50
> 
> Winchester and Eastleigh Healthcare NHS Trust
> 
> Romsey Road
> 
> Winchester
> 
> Hampshire SO22 5DG
> 
> Tel: 01962 825709
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: UK medical/ health care library community /
> information workers
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
> Sent: 22 June 2007 11:58
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: BMJ Group press release: New partnership
> delivers ? gold
> standard' evidence at the point of care
> 
> 
> BMJ Group press release: New partnership delivers
> 'gold standard'
> evidence at the point of care
> 
> 
> 
> The BMJ Group has teamed up with the Map of Medicine
> to supply an
> evidence surveillance service to underpin the Map of
> Medicine for
> clinicians across the NHS. 
> 
> The Map of Medicine is a web-based tool that
> provides national and local
> 'pathways' of best practice for over 380 medical
> conditions. It presents
> the diagnostic and treatment information that
> clinicians need when
> they're caring for patients in an intuitive,
> flow-chart format. 
> 
> Under the partnership, the BMJ Group's Knowledge
> team of clinical and
> scientific editors will provide a continuous
> evidence surveillance
> service for Map of Medicine pathways, based on
> identification and
> critical appraisal of emerging research and
> systematic reviews, new
> international guidelines, and drug safety alerts. 
> 
> New evidence will be matched with existing pathways
> so that the Map of
> Medicine can be updated accordingly. This will
> ensure that clinicians
> can be confident that by following the pathways,
> they are practising in
> a manner that is consistent with the latest research
> evidence. 
> 
> "With greater emphasis on patient safety and
> standards of care, the need
> for good quality evidence-based information to
> support care pathways and
> decision support tools is greater than ever," says
> Dr David Tovey,
> Editorial Director at the BMJ Group. "This
> partnership is an important
> step towards improving patient care directly through
> evidence-based
> knowledge." 
> 
> Neil Ferguson from the Map of Medicine said: "The
> BMJ Group has been a
> leader in the field of evidence-based medicine since
> 1999 and is
> respected internationally for its integrity,
> independence, and high
> quality products. Their process for searching
> through, appraising and
> reviewing latest studies is second to none and we
> are delighted to have
> their expertise behind 'the Map'. With their help,
> we look forward to
> delivering the highest quality evidence-based
> information to our users."
> 
> 
> Ends 
> 
> Notes to Editors: 
> The Map of Medicine, in partnership with the NHS
> National Library for
> Health, is a knowledge management tool designed to: 
> 
> *	Help NHS organisations agree and adopt local
> best-practice
> according to current and future configuration of
> healthcare services. 
> *	Enable patient care pathways to be customised with
> local
> clinical and administrative notes to better organise
> interactions
> between primary and secondary care. 
> *	Improve patient care by saving clinical staff time
> keeping up to
> date with the latest best practice and evidence
> based clinical
> guidelines.
> 
> The clinical knowledge in the Map of Medicine is
> visually presented in
> more than 380 patient 'journeys' starting from an
> initial patient visit.
> The content covers all major diagnostic areas
> including accident and
> emergency, internal medicine, surgery, paediatrics,
> obstetrics,
> gynaecology, oncology and palliative care.   
> 
> The BMJ Group is one of the world leaders in medical
> publishing. The
> Group publishes and distributes leading journals
> covering all major
> medical specialties and Clinical Evidence, the
> international source of
> the best available evidence for effective health
> care, freely available
> to over one million clinicians worldwide, and
> translated into 7
> 
=== message truncated ===



Andy Richardson
 
  I'm running the London Marathon on 22nd April 2007
  Check my progress and sponsor me via http://andymarathon07.blogspot.com/