FN ISI Export Format
VR 1.0
PT J
AU Brown, LA
TI Planting the bones: Hunting ceremonialism at contemporary and
   nineteenth-century shrines in the Guatemalan Highlands
SO LATIN AMERICAN ANTIQUITY
AB From the Classic period to the present, scholars have documented the
   widespread Maya belief in a supernatural guardian of the animals who
   must be appeased in hunting rituals. Despite this resilience, features
   and deposits entering the archaeological record as a result of hunting
   ceremonies remain largely unknown. I describe several contemporary and
   nineteenth century shrines used for hunting rites in the Maya highlands
   of Guatemala. These sites contain a unique feature, a ritual fauna
   cache, which consists of animal remains secondarily deposited during
   hunting ceremonies. The formation of these caches is informed by two
   beliefs with historical time depth: (1) the belief in a guardian of
   animals and (2) the symbolic conflation of bone and regeneration. The
   unique life history of remains in hunting-related ritual fauna caches
   suggests a hypothesis for puzzling deposits of mammal remains recovered
   archaeologically in lowland Maya caves. These may have functioned in
   hunting rites designed to placate the animal guardian and ensure the
   regeneration of the species via ceremonies that incorporated the
   secondary discard of skeletal remains. A review of the ethnographic
   literature from the Lenca, Huichol, Nahua, Tlapanec, and Mixe areas
   reveals similar hunting rites indicating a broader Mesoamerican ritual
   practice.
SN 1045-6635
PD JUN
PY 2005
VL 16
IS 2
BP 131
EP 146
UT ISI:000230258800002
ER

PT J
AU [Anon]
TI In search of the "Maya diet": Is regional comparison possible in the
   Maya tropics?
SO ARCHAEOFAUNA
AB For years archaeologists have attempted to describe the ancient "Maya
   diet" and other pan-Maya patterns in the use of animals. We need such
   descriptions before we can understand what animal-use choices were
   defined by regional culturevalues rather than by local resource
   availability. But differences in archaeological methods and theoretical
   focus as well as biases imposed by variabilityin preservation and
   taphonomy, both between and within sites, obstruct our comparing data
   sets from various Maya sites, and thereby recognizing the
   ancientpan-Maya animal-use patterns. This paper compares data from
   archaeological sites across the Maya world, discussing the theoretical
   premises of the researchand the biases in recovery methods and
   preservational conditions, to evaluatethe utility of the data for
   regional comparison. The paper discusses the possibilities for a
   realistic interpretation of regional or pan-Maya animal-use patterns
   and presents suggestions for increasing sample comparability and
   regional interpretation.
SN 1132-6891
PD OCT
PY 2004
VL 13
BP 37
EP 56
UT ISI:000227982000004
ER

PT J
AU [Anon]
TI Adding flesh to bones: Using zooarchaeology research to answer the
   big-picture questions
SO ARCHAEOFAUNA
AB Faunal analysis can give clues to the quality of life for the elite and
   the general population. Many studies have discussed how a general Maya
   diet was affected by population pressure, but few have looked directly
   at the archaeological dietary remains. This paper looks at the adaptive
   responses to the increasing requirements for animal resources at
   Caracol, Belize, such as importation ofanimal products, specialization
   of animal use strategies, and animal management.
SN 1132-6891
PD OCT
PY 2004
VL 13
BP 155
EP 172
UT ISI:000227982000012
ER

PT J
AU [Anon]
TI Stable isotopes and the human-animal interface in Maya biosocial and
   environmental systems
SO ARCHAEOFAUNA
AB Stable isotope analysis of human skeletons has been used succesfully
   for yearsto determine the quatity and kind of animals consumed as food,
   even in the humid tropics where skeletal material may not be
   diagnostically useful for many other things. This paper discusses the
   largely unrealized potential, and the pros and cons, of using stable
   isotopic analysis of animals to answer questionsabout humans. Animals
   share the same ecosystem with humans and are often incorporated into
   social and ideological systems. The paper examines the use of
   intentionally fed animals as proxies for humans where human material is
   politically or archaeologically unavailable; it also reviews other
   aspects of ancient life, including the role of animals in the exercise
   of ideological practice, human-animal relationships involved in
   hunting, synathropy, domestication, and husbanding, and the use of
   animals as barometers of human-induced and natural environmental
   change. The examples in the paper are taken from isotopic analyses at
   various Maya sites.
SN 1132-6891
PD OCT
PY 2004
VL 13
BP 183
EP 198
UT ISI:000227982000014
ER

PT J
AU Cucina, A
   Tiesler, V
TI Dental caries and antemortem tooth loss in the Northern Peten area,
   Mexico: A biocultural perspective on social status differences among
   the Classic Maya
SO AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
AB Dental caries and antemortem tooth loss (AMTL) are investigated in a
   Classic Maya sample obtained from the sites of Calakmul, Dzibanche, and
   Kohunlich (Mexico). This study aims at assessing the effect that sex
   and social status had on the prevalence of oral pathologies. The lack
   of a direct relationship between caries, AMTL, and age-at-death led us
   to interpret the results in terms of the biological, socioeconomic, and
   behavioral conditions prevailing in these ancient Maya settlements.
   Benefits related to sex and social status are evident in the frequency
   of carious lesions, which appear less frequently in elite males than in
   low-status individuals of both sexes and in elite females. Individuals
   from problematic mortuary contexts and isolated bone assemblages, who
   could not be ascribed to any status group, showed the highest rates of
   caries. Sex discrimination in dietary preferences appears in the elite
   sample, while the homogeneity encountered between sexes in the
   low-status segment suggests a more uniform access to resources. Tooth
   loss clearly distinguishes elite individuals from commoners, regardless
   of sex, with the former bearing a much higher rate of loss. In
   individuals from the undefined mortuary assemblages and sacrificial
   contexts, it was even more pronounced than in the other groups,
   although its interpretation is problematic due to a lack of associated
   funerary data. The overall evidence from oral pathologies is
   interpreted to be the result of deficient oral hygiene coupled with a
   softer and more refined diet in the high-status population,
   particularly males. Whereas elite males' subsistence was apparently
   based more on animal proteins and relatively soft and refined foods, a
   diet relying on carbohydrates may account for the observed rate of oral
   pathologies in elite females and commoners. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
SN 0002-9483
PD SEP
PY 2003
VL 122
IS 1
BP 1
EP 10
UT ISI:000185010900001
ER

PT J
AU Emery, KF
TI The noble beast: Status and differential access to animals in the Maya
   world
SO WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY
AB In the Maya world of Central America some animal species were used as
   luxury goods and foods, access to which was differentially available on
   the basis of social rank or authority. Zooarchaeological research in
   the Petexbatun region of Guatemala reveals complexity in the
   distribution of animal remains between hierarchically ranked
   residences. Ina comparison of animal use between elite households at
   Aguateca, resource access reflects variations in social rank, not
   occupational differences between high-status families. Diachronic
   analyses of species used throughout the Peterbatun region also indicate
   changes in status- differentiated use of favoured animals during
   periods of political stress. Variability in both samples is explained
   as the effect of individual or household responses to locally specific
   social and historical conditions.
SN 0043-8243
PD FEB
PY 2003
VL 34
IS 3
BP 498
EP 515
UT ISI:000181338100007
ER

PT J
AU Masson, MA
TI Animal resource manipulation in ritual and domestic contexts at
   Postclassic Maya communities
SO WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY
SN 0043-8243
PD JUN
PY 1999
VL 31
IS 1
BP 93
EP 120
UT ISI:000081312400006
ER

PT J
AU CLUTTONBROCK, J
   HAMMOND, N
TI HOT DOGS - COMESTIBLE CANIDS IN PRECLASSIC MAYA CULTURE AT CUELLO,
   BELIZE
SO JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE
AB The contribution of animal protein to the ancient Maya diet, and its
   means of procurement, can be assessed more accurately on the basis of
   systematic faunal recovery from recent excavations.  We evaluate the
   presence of dog (Canis familiaris) remains in Preclassic (1200 BC-AD
   250) deposits from the Maya site of Cuello, Belize, and conclude that
   the animals were raised for food and killed at the end of their first
   year of life.  The frequency and distribution of canid bones suggest a
   significant but not dominant contribution to the meat supply throughout
   the Preclassic period.
SN 0305-4403
PD NOV
PY 1994
VL 21
IS 6
BP 819
EP 826
UT ISI:A1994PW36200009
ER

PT J
AU WEIL, AT
   DAVIS, W
TI BUFO ALVARIUS - A POTENT HALLUCINOGEN OF ANIMAL ORIGIN
SO JOURNAL OF ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY
AB Anthropologists have long speculated that ancient peoples of
   Mesoamerica used a toad, Bufo marinus, as a ritual intoxicant. This
   hypothesis rests on many iconographic and mythological representations
   of toads and on a number of speculative ethnographic reports. The
   authors reject B. marinus as a candidate for such use because of the
   toxicity of its venom. A more likely candidate is the Sonoran desert
   toad, Bufo alvarius, which secretes large amounts of the potent known
   hallucinogen, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT). The authors
   demonstrate that the venom of B. alvarius, although known to be toxic
   when consumed orally, may be safely smoked and is powerfully
   psychoactive by that route of administration. These experiments are the
   first documentation of an hallucinogenic agent from the animal kingdom,
   and they provide clear evidence of a psychoactive toad that could have
   been employed by Precolumbian peoples of the New World.
SN 0378-8741
PD JAN
PY 1994
VL 41
IS 1-2
BP 1
EP 8
UT ISI:A1994MX06600001
ER

EF

Stephanie Vann