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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Chris,

>
> > My favorite illustrations in the OE
Illustrated Hexateuch are of the
> dragon-boat Noah's ark. Then you have seen the
Moses with horned
> Viking cap seated on his "Michaelangelo"
throne..
>
> yes, i've got those, somewhere.  i stopped the
scanning project because i
> realised that keeping track of such an immense
number of .jpgs was getting
> quite out of hand and i needed to develop some
sort of "system" before going
> on.
>
> i'm constantly amazed at the stuff that is in
there.
>
> here's a double volute motif which looks like it
is straight off an archaic
> Greek pot:
>
>
http://www.christophersbookroom.com/cc/mss/hexateu
ch/bands/f38v-bands.jpg
>
> (we'll see whether that url works --if not, go
here
>
>
http://www.christophersbookroom.com/cc/mss/hexateu
ch/bands/
>
> and then find the f38v-bands.jpg  file.)
>
> > We have a slight misunderstanding here. The OE
Hexateuch contains AElfric's
> explanatory letter and his translation of
Genesis through
> the binding of  Isaac -- from there through the
other 4 books of  the
> pentateuih and Joshua the texts are from an
earlier, existing translation
> into OE.
>
> > The Genesis in the Junius MS is one of the
great poetic codices and an MS
> that may very well turn out to be a collection
of plays. This poem/play is
> called Genesis A. The Old Saxon version (not OE,
> Old Saxon) is called Genesis B.
>
>
> yes, i see now.
>
> perversely, i have no interest in the actual
content of the OEH text --not
> even in most of the iconography, as such.
>
> my interest is purely stylistic --i'm trying to
establish connections between
> this very curious style from (apparently) the
second quarter of the 11th
> century and some mid-12th c. French sculpture, a
full century later.

You should be interested in the recent works on
the OE > French connection
in literary motifs....  I'll dig up some bib for
you... I know Howlett has
written on this.

> the Working Hypothesis is that the illuminations
in the OEH ms are in a style
> which had been developing for several
generations (before reaching the stage
> of Complexity and Clearity as we see it there),
back into the last decades of
> the 10th c.

> i like the idea (especially because it appears
to be my own) that the Vector
> by which the style came to France was in the
form of Abbot Abbo of Fleury, and
> that from Fleury it spread to some other
places --mostly connected to Fleury--
> in France.

possible
> > Throughly modern resonances? History does not
repeat itself;
>
> didn't mean to imply that it did.
>
> would make Life so much more Boring, were it
true.
>
> on the contrary, God, in Her infinite Wisdom,
has decreed Variety as the State
> of Things.
>
> >historic patterns repeat -- and this one is
deja vu all over again.
>
> which one, the Julius
Caesar/Elisabethan/McCarthy/Duhbya I motif?
>
> yeah, deja vu and a Drag to watch, as well.
>
> >Just think of all the modern commentaries on
why there is evil or the
> "modern" concept of  natural man is "good" and
civilization is "evil" -- as if
> these very topics are not the subjects of
literary works back at Sumer.
>
> hey, History *Began* at Sumer, i heard
somewhere.

The written record began at Sumer, but I kinda
doubt
that hisroty did.

> >Come to think of it, Gilgamesh would make a
nifty movie for the lovers of
> special effects...
>
> as would some of the stories in the Nag Hammadi
mss.
>
> pure Science Fiction, that stuff.
>
> certainly more interesting and imaginative than
a whole passel of "Star Wars"
> sequences, ho hum.
>
> > I do not put down our modern world,
>
> go ahead, knock yourself out.
>
> you'll get no arguments about it from me.
>
> >but as historians we should know that we are
neither the first nor are we
> unique.
>
> well, you may hold that opinion because you do
not have the Honor of living in
> the Greatest Country in the History of the
World.


I'm a born and bred Chicagoan <G> that's right,
an "Amurican" to quote one of our last half of
th 20th CE presidents... I do a lot of
intercontinental
trotting around.

>
> >What is different is our technology, but that
does not change the
> patterns.
>
> except, perhaps, that the technology may make
all them patterns *Terminal*.
>
> > I wish you very good luck on this project;
that MS is delightful... you
> might want to include the pre-Rashi Hebrew
alphabet that runs across
> the bottom of one of the leaves -- the one
written by a young lady named
> Elizabeth -- who signed her name three times in
Hebrew and spelled it
> correctly... it's not part of the original
illustrations, but it is a
> graphic.
>
> i haven't come across that one, yet.
>
> > As an entusiastic fan of the OE Hexateuch, I
am delightedly yours,
>
> the mind boggles.
>
> c
>
>
> "What about the older ones [Indians] ?"
>
> "Well, we can't seem to cure them of the idea
that our Everyday Life is only
> an Illusion, behind which is the Reality of
Dreams"
>
> --Werner Herzog's "Fitzcarraldo"
> http://us.imdb.com/Title?0083946
>
>
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