Print

Print


For the earliest woad so far known in Britain, see M van der Veen in Jeffrey
May, Dragonby, Report on Excavations at an Iron Age and Romano-British
Settlement in North Lincolnshire, Vol.1 pp.197-211, Oxbow Monograph 61
(1996), which followed M van der Veen, A J Hall & J May, 'Woad and the
Britons painted blue', Oxford Journal of Archaeology 12 (1993) 367-71.

Jeffrey May


----- Original Message -----
From: "John Wood" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2003 3:34 PM
Subject: Re: woad


> Though shouldn't we be finding this stuff on iron age sites in Britain. Do
> we have any known cases?
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "david freeman" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2003 2:15 PM
> Subject: Re: woad
>
>
> > Gaul, it would seem!
> >
> > David
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "John Wood" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2003 2:14 PM
> > Subject: Re: woad
> >
> >
> > > David Freeman wrote:
> > > >
> > > > If the interest is the Roman comment 'paint themselves blue', Caesar
> > > > mentions vitrum, which is a blue volcanic glass high in cobalt, that
> can
> > > be
> > > > ground down into powder and painted onto the skin when mixed with
> animal
> > > > fat.
> > > >
> > > > David
> > > >
> > >
> > > If so where would the vitrium originate? I imagine it would not occur
> > > naturally in Britain, unless proven wrong.
> > >
> > >
> >
>