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Reading my great grandfather's war diary he uses the term 'entrain' for
boarding a railway carriage. It seems that though this term was in common
useage from the references I have come across it is mainly used by the
military up until 1918.

----- Original Message -----
From: "White, Bill" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2003 11:37 AM
Subject: Re: Resurrection of antiquated terms


> P.T.Barnum, the showman, used to relieve congestion at
> his exhibition by speeding the exit of visitors. A sign
> bore the legend: "This way to the Egress". The punters
> would head of in the direction indicated by the arrow,
> thinking they were to see some further attraction, only
> to find that they had arrived outside.
>
> I remember a sign that used to be on many station
> entrances/platforms reading: "All tickets to be shewn".
> Is this antiquated spelling now obsolete?
>
> Bill
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Rose, Edwin [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: 21 July 2003 11:29
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Resurrection of antiquated terms
>
>
> Has anyone else noted the number of signs on road works that now say,
> Works Egress, instead of exit?
> Way out, man
>
>
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