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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Sadly, the feast of Benedict, celebrated for so many centuries in so many
places on this date, is no longer commemorated on this day in the Latin
Church. After Vatican II, the reformers of the calendar, heedless of very
ancient traditions, moved this feast, like so many others, out of the last
weeks of Lent. Benedict now languishes on July 11, the traditional date of
the theft from Monte Cassino of his relics by the monks of Fleury in the 7th
century, given the high sounding title of  "translatio s. Benedicti".
jw   >:(

John B. Wickstrom
Kalamazoo College
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-----Original Message-----
From: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
[mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of Phyllis Jestice
Sent: Thursday, March 21, 2002 10:57 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [M-R] saints of the day 21. March


medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (21. March) is the feast day of:

Serapion of Thmuis (d. c. 365)  Serapion was a disciple and companion of
Antony the Great and a friend of Athanasios.  In 339 he became bishop of
Thmuis in lower Egypt.  In office, he was a vigorous opponent of Arianism,
and defended Athanasios before the Council of Sardika (343) on this issue.
Serapion was a well-educated writer, with the nickname "scholasticus."

Lupicinus (d. c. 480)  After his wife died, Lupicinus followed his brother
Romanus to become a hermit in the Jura (France).  The pair attracted
numerous disciples, and ended up creating a monastic community, the later
monastery of Condat (St-Claude).  Lupicinus also founded the monastery of
St-Lupicin and the convent of La Beaume.

Enda of Aran (d. c. 530)   Enda was the father of the great monastic
expansion in Ireland.  After a first "career"  as a warrior, Enda became a
monk.  He went for training to St. Ninian's monastery of Candida Casa in
Scotland.  On his return to Ireland, Enda founded monasteries in the Boyne
valley.  He finally settled at Inishmore, the largest of the Aran Islands.
This monastery, according to tradition, was the first large monastery in
Ireland.  It became a nursery of the early saints of Ireland, and Enda's
many disciples are said to have included Ciarán of Clonmacnoise.  Enda's
rule for monks was very strict and even included manual labor (unusual for
Irish monks); according to later tradition, he insisted on weeding with his
own hands and digging ditches without tools, and forced his monks to do the
same.

Benedict of Nursia (d. c. 547)  "The father of western monasticism,"
Benedict was born in Nursia in c. 480 to a prosperous family.  He studied
in Rome, but soon left the city and joined a community of hermits in the
Sabine hills.  Then he lived for three years in a cave near Subiaco.  A
nearby community of hermits made him their leader, but refused his efforts
to reform the community and tried to poison him; Benedict went back to
Subiaco.  There he developed his own monastic community, moving in c. 529
to Monte Cassino.  His Rule for Monks of  course eventually swept Europe,
thanks especially to the support given it by the Carolingians.

Dr. Phyllis G. Jestice
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