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Hi,
thanks for this note. To some degree of course you are right that minimum
standards of visual documentation would be great - however, seeing as we are
currently relying on the kindness and generosity of curators on this list and
elsewhere to submit installation images to us (hint, hint), i'm posting
whatever I get and we will build it up from there. In cases where I
personally can be present at these exhibitions I will endeavor to request
permission to take more digital photos and perhaps something like quicktime
VR (have you all seen the surround-gallery view of net_condition at the ZKM
site? visit, I think it is:
http://on1.zkm.de/netCondition.root/netcondition/start/language/default_e/
and download the free plug-in). Rules concerning installation photography
differ from institution to institution as I'm sure many of you know. We here
at crumb have been discussing ways of funding the creation of a database
whereby we could standardize this research... until then I think it bears
repeating the request to curators on this list to share with us the ways in
which you've documented your new media exhibitions in the past, as well as
suggestions for future documentation (i.e. I know Barbara London and I
discussed the exhibition series in the cafe etc. space at MoMA in NY for
example). And then, please share with us if you can the images you've got.
For now we'll even accept old fashioned slides which we can scan here and
post back to you!
thanks,
Sarah


Ittai Bar-Joseph wrote:

> Hi,
> Sorry for the late response to this thread. Been busy...
> Visiting the page (www.newmedia.sunderland.ac.uk/crumb/maup/maup.html)
> Sarah has put up on the crumb site, I was disappointed to see digital
> images that scarcely give any idea of what the exhibitions looked like. I
> think that if we are to discuss questions such as the minimal analytical
> unit problem, we might first want to agree on minimum standards of visual
> documentation of an exhibition.
> I think that  QuickTime VR technology (both to record exhibition space and
> exhibited objects) would be a feasible and more informative way of showing
> things. It is a very simple technique, easy to learn and only requires the
> software, a low-res digital camera and a tripod.
> Chau,
> Ittai Bar-Joseph
> Jerusalem