Print

Print


<Hi, SeaRaven, I hope you do not mind my sending this to the gender-religion
listserv.  I wonder if you are already on it?  It's pretty cool.>  Merry
Meet, gender-religion folks.  I thought someone would find this interesting
and perhaps have more info.

> ----------
> From:         Sea Raven[SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
> Reply To:     [log in to unmask]
> Sent:         Saturday, March 03, 2001 6:18 AM
> To:   [log in to unmask]
> Subject:      Re: [RWTO] Spirituality and Activism - New to the List
>
> Heather wrote --
>
> "Also, can someone send me info about the pagan roots of Lent... I found
> something yesterday about it how used to be a day to celebrate an
> Anglo-Saxon War God... but it sounded slanted... curious as to it
> correlation with Mardi Gras... and of course the significance of "40 days"
> and Easter... I send emails to friends every holiday... and realized I had
> nothing on Ash Wednesday... it's got have an amazing pagan history."
>
> I'll identify myself as a "Cristo-Pagan" for the moment -- meaning I'm a
> very progressive Christian.
>
> Here's my educated guess, based on my own fairly extensive study:
>
> I don't know if Ash Wednesday has Pagan roots.  If anyone on the list DOES
> know, please say so.  I'd also like to know the connection between Imbolc
> --
> the beginning of Celtic Spring -- and this curious Christian gloss called
> Lent.  There was a huge fight in the 5th Century between the Roman Church
> and the Celtic church in Britain about calculating the date of Easter.
> That
> was rammed down the Celtic Church's throat as being the first Sunday after
> the First Full Moon after the Spring Equinox, so that Easter would be
> associated with the Jewish Passover, which begins with the First Full Moon
> after the Spring Equinox.   Lent begins 40 days before Easter Sunday (see
> below).  So Mardi-Gras seems to have gotten separated out from Imbolc and
> Ostara, perhaps combining metaphor from both.
>
> Mardi Gras is indeed from the old custom of using up the last of the food
> in
> the dark time before Spring.  If my German recollection is correct, in
> German tradition it's called "Fasching" and includes clearing out the
> dregs
> in the beer vats to make room for new brew (hence:  Bock Beer -- which is
> now specifically brewed, but used to be the heady stuff left over).  I
> realize there are folk in this list who know Fasching much better than I,
> and might want to chime in.
>
> When the Western Christian Church  began incorporating Pagan ways into its
> own dogma/doctrine, Mardi-Gras became the last party before the 40 days of
> fasting and penance.  No sex was allowed, no meat, no pleasure, etc. etc.
> The 40 days, of course, reflects the tradition of Jesus spending 40 days
> in
> the wilderness before taking up his ministry in the Galilee.
>
> Ash Wednesday is the beginning of the penance.  The penance is based on
> Fall-Redemption theology (which was institutionalized with St. Augustine
> in
> the 4th Century).  Fall-Redemption means that all creation is evil and can
> only be redeemed by the blood sacrifice of Jesus.  Covering ones-self with
> Ashes is an ancient (Hebrew/Jewish/Eastern) way of expressing grief and/or
> the desire to atone for sin.  It also reflects the idea from Genesis that
> we
> come from dust (ashes) and to dust we shall return.  Lots of Negative
> death
> imagery, sorrow, grief, remorse, etc.
>
> I do doubt that such a tradition had any beginning with a Pagan/Mystical
> spiritual tradition  that comes from the idea that God/dess is revealed in
> and is an expression of the natural world.   The blood sacrifice of Jesus
> is
> likely also related to the Pagan idea of the dying/rising god.
>
> My personal theology rejects fall-redemption out of hand.  But this is
> off-topic.  For more discussion off-list, please email me privately -- and
> visit my website for more information.
>
> The Goddess is Alive and Magic is Afoot
> Sea Raven
> Writer, Harper, Singer, and Candidate for
> Doctor of Ministry in Creation Spirituality
> Website:  www.gaiarising.org
>
>
>
> Thanks,
> Heather
>
>
> eActivist.org [http://www.eActivist.org] works to encourage electronic
> activism and civic participation by providing a comprehensive collection
> of
> simple, easy-to-use progressive electronic
> actions and tools for the electronic activist. We partner with highly
> respected
> organizations from around the globe to deliver the best of electronic
> activism in a
> fast and effective format.  eActivist.org is an action resource created to
> activate
> social change and unite the global community.
>
> eActivist.org is a 100% volunteer, not-for-profit project of the Tides
> Center.
>
> To subscribe to our bi-monthly e-mailing send a blank message to:
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
>
> Click for Details
>
>
> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
>
>
> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
>
>