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       pastoral domain, I believe, wanting is structured                        
                                                                         I īthis
differently. "Perfection," a plenitude (ontological,                            
metaphorical) would be, as I think Professor Grossman implied, a stasis         
which would hence preclude "joy and eternal Bliss."  Within the
"endless" or infinite there is no absolute consummation, in which desire
and narrative would be consumed. But there may be other forms of intimate
scission, a recursive, hysterological, nesting or enfolding, for instance,
or a catachretic binding of disparates which cannot mean because it means
too much -- which exactly is what makes it joy. Not narrative, perhaps,
but music and poetry, the forms through which pastoral speaks. 

Dr. Shirley Sharon-Zisser   


> >This discussion is probably better addressed to the Milton-List, but what
> >the hell. I was wondering what Marshall and John might make of how desire
> >works in Heaven, pre-Lapsarian Heaven, that is. The angels feel love and
> >clearly a form of sexual love (is it carnal?). Is Milton perhaps positing a
> >form of desire that not predicated upon lack?
> >
> >Peter C. Herman
> >
> >At 06:28 PM 10/22/00 -0400, you wrote:
> >>Yes. But Milton is interestingly inconsistent on the point.
> >>"New Heaven and earth" rise from the ashes of heaven and
> >>earth as we know it, and it is not entirely obvious that
> >>souls come through the conflagration with their
> >>individuality, their histories and their personal memories
> >>and their wills (if souls have wills) . Milton says that
> >>when new heaven and earth come "God will be All in All."
> >>Does this mean God will permeate a universe like ours, or
> >>that the his creatio per se will return to undifferentiated
> >>being? Milton in general seems to me to sustains as radical
> >>a reading as we might want to give him.
> >>
> >>And that's if we want to read his theology back into his
> >>narrative. Whatever he thinks about the relationship of
> >>individual subjectivity to unfulfilled desire, his
> >>narrative vehicle won't carry him past "God is All in All"
> >>so Milton may not think that desire is not endlessly
> >>deferred but his poem knows that when and if it desire is
> >>ended, so too is the story.
> >>
> >>On Sun, 22 Oct 2000 17:38:44 -0400John Leonard
> >><[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >> > -----Original Message-----
> >> > From: d. m. frances batycki <[log in to unmask]>
> >> > To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
> >> > Date: October 22, 2000 4:43 PM
> >> > Subject: Re: Milton's wanting soul
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > >
> >> > >The wanting soul is indeed imperfect; it is lacking and awaiting
> >> > >and,according to the very notion of original sin, always desiring a
> >> > >perfection it can never have.It's imperfection is in the now, the
> >> > >present, but the "lacking" or "wanting" exists in the paradox of desire.
> >> > >Perfection can only exist in some endlessly deferred future.
> >> > >Frances Batycki
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > "Endlessly deferred"?Certainly not in in Milton, who anticipates a
> future
> >> > in which the desires of the redeemed *will* be gratified:
> >> >
> >> > "New heavens, new earth, ages of endless date
> >> > Founded in righteousness and peace and love
> >> > To bring forth fruits Joy and eternal Bliss."(PL 12 548-50).
> >> >
> >> > The word "endless" in Milton is always used of either salvation or
> >> > damnation.It is never used of pointless waiting.  Milton's hope
> might be
> >> > unfounded, but the hope is sincere, and he is hoping for more than
> >> > deferment.
> >> >
> >> > Yours derentially,
> >> >
> >> > John Leonard
> >> >
> >>
> >>----------------------
> >>Marshall Grossman
> >>[log in to unmask]
> >
> >
> 




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