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SPACESYNTAX  July 2018

SPACESYNTAX July 2018

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Subject:

Re: Question (evidence)

From:

Khalid Mohammed <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Khalid Mohammed <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 24 Jul 2018 09:02:30 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (222 lines)

Good Day,
Due to technical errors, please remove my email from your list.
Many thanks.

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 7/24/18, Bin Jiang <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

 Subject: Re: Question (evidence)
 To: [log in to unmask]
 Date: Tuesday, July 24, 2018, 11:02 AM
 
 
 Dear Anonymous and other colleagues,
 It is an excellent question!!!
 I have long had this short answer: seeking answers on why
 space syntax works from human cognitive aspects - for
 example how humans conceptualize distance or space or how
 humans minimum angles and distances - is a fallacy; see this
 earlier paper:
 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/2177752_Ranking_Space_for_Predicting_Human_Movement_in_an_Urban_Environment
 Why axial space syntax works - rather than segment
 analysis that fails to capture the living structure - is
 little to do with human cognitive aspects. Instead it is to
 do with the underlying living structure of far more
 less-connected streets than well-connected
  ones. In other words, given a street network, people's
 flow and random walkers' flow are essentially the same,
 because both are substantially shaped by the underlying
 living structure. In other words, a majority of traffic flow
 (e.g.  up to 80%) is determined
  by the living structure or wholeness - the key notion in
 The Nature of Order (Alexander 2002-2005).
 
 
 
 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/325848238_Why_Topology_Matters_in_Predicting_Human_Activities
 
 
 Thanks and cheers.
 
 
 
 Bin
 
 On 7/24/2018 8:45 AM,
 Penn, Alan wrote:
 
 
 
 A couple points on this question, but sorry no answer. I’d
 be interested in responses too. 
 
 
 
 Minimum angle deviation paths are also distance
 minimising so the question of what people are optimising
 must remain open. Topological simplest paths (fewest axial
 lines) might be thought of as reducing decisions and so
 reducing cognitive load in some
  way, if only in terms of the need to remember a route. 
 
 
 
 Sent from my
 iPhone
 
 
 On 24 Jul 2018, at 07:00, Subik Shrestha <[log in to unmask]>
 wrote:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Hi there,
 
 
 
 
 
 You might find the following paper or the references in the
 paper to be helpful in this regard (although the paper is
 not about the human brain's way of navigating):
 
 
 
 
 
 http://spacesyntax.tudelft.nl/media/Long%20papers%20I/hillieriida.pdf
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Thanks,
 
 Subik
 
 
 
 
 
 On Mon, Jul 23, 2018 at 8:56 PM SUBSCRIBE
 SPACESYNTAX Anonymous <[log in to unmask]>
 wrote:
 
 
 
 Hi Space syntax community,
 
 
 
 Thank you for being actively involved in academic discussion
 on space syntax. I do have one question on which hope you
 could please help. I’d be thankful to have your answer on
 this question supported by academic evidence. The question
 is:
 
 
 
 - As says in space syntax, over time people tend to have
 “least angular deviations” when traverse between
 destinations. This is because they wanna unintentionally
 “minimaise their brain navigation processing”. And, this
 is again because “least angular deviation”
  can produce “cognitively simplest journeys”.  Now my
 question is do we have academic evidence (either lab-based
 or in a free condition) that a pattern with least angular
 deviation is cognitively easier for brain navigation? (I
 understand Kevin Lynch’s work
  may be cited on this; but I’m after more robust new
 evidence). 
 
 
 
 Thanks,
 
 
 
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 -- 
 
 --------------------------------------------------------
 Bin Jiang
 Division of GIScience
 Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development
 University of Gävle, SE-801 76 Gävle, Sweden
 Phone: +46-26-64 8901    Fax: +46-26-64 8758
 Email: [log in to unmask]
  Web: http://giscience.hig.se/binjiang/
 --------------------------------------------------------
 
 Associate Editor: Cartographica
 BinsArXiv: http://arxiv.org/a/jiang_b_1
 Axwoman: http://giscience.hig.se/binjiang/axwoman/
 Geomatics: http://giscience.hig.se/binjiang/geomaticsprogram/
 RG: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bin_Jiang3
 
 
 
 
 Högskolan i Gävle, 801 76 Gävle
 • 026 64 85 00 •
 www.hig.se 
 För en
 hållbar livsmiljö för människan
 
 University of
 Gävle, SE-801 76 Gävle, Sweden • +46 (0) 26 64 85 00 •
 www.hig.se 
 
 
 
 
 To unsubscribe from the SPACESYNTAX list,
 click the following link:
 
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