JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN Archives

PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN  July 2018

PHD-DESIGN July 2018

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

attracation, distraction, addiction

From:

Keith Russell <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 21 Jul 2018 01:30:01 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (57 lines)

attraction, distraction, addiction



One of the substantial issues that Don raised in relation to designs that are not user-centric is the experience of distraction and then, by extension, the development of addictive relations with external systems.



The company with the most current patent applications, in Australia, is a maker of poker machines and more importantly, poker machine games. They have more applications than our leading scientific body, CSIRO. The designing of addiction is a massive financially rewarding design field.



Don talked about the importance of curiosity which here, I would subsume into the category of attraction. We must first be, at a minimum, attracted to something before we can determine it is curious, novel, interesting etc.



Attraction, in it most immediate form, can be determined as interruption. That is, our cognitive systems are radically open to interruption. If this were not the case, we would have been wiped out by predators thousands of years ago. People taking amphetamines are able to stay focused on a spiderís web for hours which is amusing but dumb and dangerous.



When we drive, we need to ensure that we donít lock onto something. We have to keep shifting our attention to open us up to novel events in the world around.



This system, of openness to attraction, makes us vulnerable to designed forms of attraction that are seeking our attention so we buy this that or the other. Much current design research is aimed precisely at this commercialization of desire. Why does my eye fall on this pink and gleaming thing? It must be talking to me. It must be a part of my lost wholeness. I will buy these cornflakes rather than those cornflakes.



If we strip all items of aesthetic attractors, we would be faced, as consumers, with decisions based on technical information such as sugar content, or on mere history (I like this one last time I bought it). This would be truer user centred design.



The problems with dopamine reward systems and poker machines are an elevated example of what we are doing to ourselves through attraction-based design. We know how these systems work and yet we are doing nothing to prevent  the social injuries these designs promote. If the same levels of addiction were being caused by chemicals in the workplace, we would have banned these things years ago.



So, yes, I support Donís concerns but I donít think they are designersí concerns unless we require designers to be professionals with the ethical responsibilities of doctors.



No more sexy Porsche 911s Ė they lead to wealthy young men dying in accidents, or worse, killing strangers.



 keith







-----------------------------------------------------------------
PhD-Design mailing list  <[log in to unmask]>
Discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design
Subscribe or Unsubscribe at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/phd-design
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager