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PHD-DESIGN  May 2018

PHD-DESIGN May 2018

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Subject:

Re: "What is Design Thinking" and "Improvement In and Through Design Thinking"

From:

Keith Russell <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 13 May 2018 02:26:31 +0000

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text/plain

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Dear Chuck,


I have been looking at on-line patterns of thinking/discourse, with one of my sons (he has more internet knowledge than I have).

On blogs and similar things, people tend to do the following:


INTERRUPT - this is the minimum -  I see this much like a computer interrupt - that is, the deepest level of interaction, in discourse and thinking, is to simply jump into the stream, hence interrupting the existing stream. I have seen design management articles that explore the uses of interruption in design teams. Some work well and seem to get to their outcome quicker; some just get interrupted. This might be compared with Zen techniques where the student is contemplating and their contemplation is INTERRUPTED by the water clock going TOCK. This could lead to enlightenment or it could just annoy the student.


DISRUPT - one might suggest that ALL INTERRUPTS also function as DISRUPTS. The distinction here goes to the quality of the moment. If something new has entered the discourse then the discourse itself has been DISRUPTED; if, however, the DISRUPTION is merely coffee time, then , yes, insights might be gained but equally, it might be the mood that is broken and the discourse is deflated.


SUBVERT - new things entering might be simply additive but they might turn things over and hence, SUBVERSION takes place. This is a pretty standard technique in academic discourse. We try the opposite approach when we become stuck; we search out radically different ideas. I punch "problems with X" into Google.


PERVERT - this technique is not that common in polite society but it is certainly a key moment on-line. Inasmuch as the PERVERSE option may also be the opening into unconscious and libidinous aspects, it has a potential for creative insights and releases of creative energy. This might be seen as merely a male discourse thing but I think it has merit as well as being clearly evident on-line with so-called spontaneous group thinking. There are patterns here that we should discern.


ABJECT - this is where most people stop. The discourse takes a turn towards the dark side and most people withdraw. But, some do not. Design, as an historic discourse, has not generally been socially or culturally or critically interested in the ABJECT. You will find moments of the ABJECT in ALESSI design commentary but, hey, the Italians can do what they like? Objects, as such, can not be decontaminated and hence they are contaminated with abjectness. The more they shine the more they speak of death. The more they are refined, the more they speak of failure.The more they seem permanent, the more immanent they become. What to do with the ABJECT in design thinking? First, it would need to be disclosed.


CORRUPT - this is where the system is exposed to itself such that it becomes an endless cycle of possibilities, and, in the case of the internet, newbies. The people involved in the discourse are no longer interested in new knowledge, insight, understanding, intimacy - they get their kicks by attracting new people and then dumping on less sophisticated souls. The institutional versions are very well known to academia.


By the way, you can see each of these elements in the fate of the daughters of the hero of Fiddler on the Roof. In the original short stories, there are five daughters. Only three are developed in the stage play and the movie versions.


INTERRUPT - First off, all events in life are interruptions - the horse goes lame, the cow goes dry, your children grown up and need to marry. This is OK - we haveTRADITION.


DISRUPTION - The first daughter to marry disrupts tradition by selecting her own husband.


SUBVERSION - The second daughter falls in love with a radical Communist Jew.


PERVERSION - The third daughter falls in love with a Christian  - this is too much.


ABJECTION - The fourth daughter becomes involved with a rich boy thanks to her father's facilitations. The romance is brought to a absolute halt by the rich family. The rejected daughter kills herself.


CORRUPTION - The father sells off  his last daughter to a war profiteer so he (the father) can go and die in Israel - which he doesn't do and his daughter doesn't care and the war profiteer gets the status of a good Jew all for the marrying of a lower class girl. What a system - what a tradition.


Hope this helps


keith




________________________________
Terry and all,

In my view, useful evidence based research on design thinking can not develop without a useful taxonomic model of what kinds of thinking are involved. I also believe that such a model is essential to education in design thinking in any field. As many of you know I have been developing and testing such a model with school children and against profile outlines on other topics and concepts. The objective has been to identify modes of thought about the kinds of information essential to design thinking and to establish their range and role. Evidence of the use of these modes, why and when they are applied, and to what effect would not be difficult to collect interpret, or apply in teaching or practice. I am no longer in a position to do that research, but would gladly help anyone willing and able to do so. It certainly needs to be done. “They are the essential foundations underpinning theorising about  design thinking.”

Or, so I believe,
Chuck
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