JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MERSENNE Archives


MERSENNE Archives

MERSENNE Archives


MERSENNE@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MERSENNE Home

MERSENNE Home

MERSENNE  December 2014

MERSENNE December 2014

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

The Dog in 20thC Science - Science in the 20thC Dog

From:

Michael Worboys <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Michael Worboys <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 9 Dec 2014 11:32:49 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (34 lines)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Pedigree Chums: The Dog in 20thC Science - Science in the 20thC Dog

Friday 26 June 2015, CHSTM, University of Manchester

The twentieth century witnessed the arrival of the modern dog. By ‘modern dog’ we mean a domesticated canine, which became increasingly pedigree-bred, convenience food fed, obedience trained and veterinary managed.

Biological and medical knowledge informed and facilitated the making of the modern dog. Genetics was crucial and this continues today with work on the dog genome. The creation of pet food industry, underpinned by nutrition research centres, transformed the ways dogs were fed, while training switched from negative to positive reinforcement altering companion relations. The rise of companion animal veterinary practice transformed the sick dog into a patient upon whom a rapidly expanding range of medical treatments was brought to bear. With these developments came new concerns and tensions, for example, health problems from close breeding and injurious conformation standards; public health concerns about toxocariasis; new policies to control fouling and dangerous dogs; and ethical debates on the scope and limits of veterinary intervention.

This is a call for papers for an interdisciplinary meeting on the history of dogs in science and science in dogs in the twentieth century. We have titled our meeting of 'Pedigree Chums' because it nicely captures our twin aims of a meeting:
(i) to explain the remaking of dogs in the twentieth-century as pedigree bred, convenience food fed, obedience-trained, and veterinary managed; and 
(ii)to explore how these changes were shaped, and were shaped by, new companionship relations between dogs and people.

We invite papers that explore critically why and how the dog has been 'remade', materially and culturally through changes in breeding, feeding, training and treating, particularly through the impact of genetics, nutritional science, ethology and psychology, and veterinary medicine. We also invite contributions on the place of the dog in biomedical research. It is often forgotten nowadays how important the dog was as animal model for human disease in the early twentieth century, most strikingly in the discovery of insulin and vitamins. Such work continued, notoriously so with beagles in research on the health effects of cigarette smoking. Our second aim is to discuss critically changing companion relations – in the home and on the street, in the dog fancy, in popular culture, and in the imagination.

Suggested themes:
The Dog in 20thC Science
•	Animal models of disease
•	Behavioural research
Science in the 20thC Dog 
•	Breeding – genetics to genomics
•	Feeding – physiology and nutritional science
•	Training – animal psychology and behavioural science
•	Treating – veterinary medicine
20thC Companion Relationships
•	Living with dogs in private and public spaces
•	Dogs and public health issues (rabies, toxocariasis) 
•	Dangerous dogs – Dangerous breeds

We hope this will be a truly interdisciplinary meeting and one that brings together researchers from all career stages, including research students. We will be applying for conference funding and hope to able to offer some support to those giving papers. Also, we will apply for veterinary continuing professional development credit with the RCVS.

Please send abstracts, with a maximum of 300 words, to Professor Michael Worboys ([log in to unmask] ) by 28 February 2015.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager