JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  December 2014

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION December 2014

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Another Saint for the Day (December 25): Anastasia of Sirmium

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 26 Dec 2014 13:41:59 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (127 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

An older post revised:

Anastasia of Sirmium (d. ca. 304, supposedly). Anastasia is a martyr of Sirmium in Pannonia (today's Sremska Mitrovica in Serbia) about whom we have many texts but nonetheless are very poorly informed. In Latin she has a complicated, romance-like, and highly legendary late antique Passio (BHL 401). A lengthy and successful attempt to provide a narrative for the presumed dedicatee of what would become known as Rome's titular and stational church of Sant'Anastasia on the Palatine, its dating is uncertain: although in 499 the church was still officially the _titulus Anastasiae_ (a name form typically honoring an early donor), Leo V's delivery of a sermon there on 25. December, the day given in the Passio as Anastasia's _dies natalis_, suggests that the association between the building and the saint may already have been current in the 450s. Anastasia's liturgical prominence in early medieval Rome is reflected by her presence in the _Nobis quoque_ of the Roman canon of the Mass and by her commemoration in the second Mass on Christmas (the Mass at dawn), a vestige of what was once her proper feast on this day. A noteworthy, albeit no longer quite so recent contribution to the study of Anastasia's cult is Paola Francesca Moretti's _La Passio Anastasiae. Introduzione, testo critico, traduzione_ (Roma: Herder, 2006). An English-language review of that is at <http://tinyurl.com/y9pjwmu>.

For those who wish to practice their Latin, herewith an unsourced text of Anastasia's legend as presented in the _Legenda aurea_ of Bl. Jacopo da Varazze:
http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/voragine/anast.shtml

Anastasia's hagiographical presence in medieval Greek and medieval Slavic texts is also legendary and richly complicated. For that, a rewarding place to begin is Jane Baun, _Tales from Another Byzantium: Celestial Journey and Local Community in the Medieval Greek Apocrypha_ (Cambridge Univ. Pr., 2007). In a brief overview at pp. 117-120 (for those with access to Google Books, this will be found at <http://tinyurl.com/24zpb7k>) Baun distinguishes among three Anastasias: Anastasia the Roman (12. October), Anastasia the Virgin (28./29. October), and Anastasia the Healer or A. _Pharmakolytria_ ('poison-curer'; 22. December). But in practice the identity of the Anastasia celebrated on one or another of these days has not always accorded with this scheme and the hagiographies of all three are interpenetrating. For the purposes of this notice they are treated as differing constructions of the same saint (but, as Anastasia the Healer has a sometimes distinctive iconography, links to images of her representative of that tradition are reserved for a special section at the end of this notice).

At Zadar in Croatia, Anastasia is a principal patron saint (feast day: 15. January), a distinction she shares with the traditionally Aquileian martyr Chrysogonus (a recurring personage in A.'s hagiography). The city's cathedral of Sv. Stošija (St. Anastasia) houses what are believed to be her relics, translated from her martyrial church in Sirmium to Constantinople at some point in the years 458-471 (so Theodore the Reader as quoted by Theophanes) and from Constantinople to Zadar at some point between 808 and 811 (cf. the rather later _Translatio Anastasiae Constantinopoli Iaderam_ [BHL 402]). A marble sarcophagus bearing inscriptions recording the relics' donation by bishop Donatus (St. Donatus of Zadar) is on display in Zadar's Archaeological Museum:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/59198268@N03/6105404205/
http://www.zadar.travel/images/original/ZADAR_Arheoloski_muzej_2_1337099207.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/olj69z5
In bright light for a clearer view of the inscriptions:
http://www.zadar.travel/images/original/sarkofag_stosija_1323816944.jpg
A copy is kept in the cathedral.

The abbey church of Santa Maria in Sylvis, an eighth-century foundation at today's Sesto al Règhena (PN) in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, shelters in its crypt a so-called sarcophagus of St. Anastasia (first documented from 1339 but utilizing carved slabs that clearly are much older). Herewith a distance view, followed by a detail view in close-up:
http://tinyurl.com/9mwaz5
https://www.flickr.com/photos/renzodionigi/2930600389/sizes/l/
Considered a masterpiece of Lombard sculpture, this object has been thought probably a reworked abbatial throne. The brief video here (an extract from a longer documentary), showing laser scanning and a 3D model in gesso, suggests a different origin:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=XflCOaVl_lw

A cranium venerated as that of Anastasia is kept in a chapel of the abbey church at Benediktbeuern. According to its translation account (BHL 403; edited in MGH, SS, vol. 9, pp. 224-229, as part of the so-called _Breviarium Gotscalchi_), it was brought thither in 1053 from the abbey of Santa Maria in Organo in Verona, a dependency of the Patriarchate of Aquileia. Whereas this account is quite believable when it associates Anastasia's cult in Aquileia with that of the locally venerated martyr Chrysogonus, its narrative of how her relics came from her resting place on Palmaria (in A.'s hagiography, one of the traditional locales of her martyrdom) to Aquileia is pure fantasy.

The originally fourteenth-century Gregoriou monastery on Mt. Athos keeps what are claimed to be major relics of Anastasia the Roman, including a complete skull and most of the body, a vial of her blood, and smallish pieces of skin. Herewith a view of some of these displayed in a case used for traveling expositions:
http://pemptousia-4.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/files/2014/10/02-IN1.jpg 

Until late April 2012, when they were reported stolen, relics believed to be those of Anastasia the Healer (most notably, part of a skull) were kept in the seemingly originally earlier sixteenth-century Patriarchal Monastery of Saint Anastasia the Healer at Vassilika (Thessaloniki prefecture) in northern Greece:
http://tinyurl.com/73lxjh5
Another view of the skull relic, this time on a visit to Kyiv / Kiev in May 2011:
https://mospat.ru/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/IMG_0464_36.jpg


Some medieval images of Anastasia of Sirmium:

a) Anastasia (at far left) as depicted in the heavily restored later sixth-century mosaics of Ravenna's basilica di Sant'Apollinare Nuovo (photograph courtesy of Genevra Kornbluth):
http://www.kornbluthphoto.com/images/ApNNorth5.jpg

b) Anastasia (at right, after St. Chrysogonus and St. Rufinus of Rome) as depicted in a degraded earlier eighth-century fresco in the lower church of Rome's basilica di San Crisogono:
http://tinyurl.com/72f68zg

c) Anastasia's martyrdom by the sword (and that of a companion) as depicted in the late tenth- or very early eleventh-century so-called Menologion of Basil II (Città del Vaticano, BAV, cod. Vat. gr. 1613, p. 49):
http://tinyurl.com/colzquw

d) Anastasia as depicted in the earlier eleventh-century mosaics (restored between 1953 and 1962) in the katholikon of the monastery of Hosios Loukas near Distomo in Phokis:
http://tinyurl.com/pf4wz62

e) Anastasia as portrayed on one of the seemingly late eleventh- or early twelfth-century silvered bronze plaques on the Porta di San Clemente of the basilica cattedrale di San Marco in Venice:
http://www.fondazionezeri.unibo.it/foto/160000/140800/140736.jpg 

f) Anastasia (or a figure so identified) as depicted in the twelfth-century frescoes of the Cripta degli Affreschi in the patriarchal basilica in Aquileia:
http://s.anastasia.wedge.ru/Pix/Photo/image_large_184.jpg

g) Anastasia as depicted in the recently cleaned twelfth-century mosaics of the Cappella Palatina in Palermo:
http://s.anastasia.wedge.ru/Pix/Photo/image_large_177.jpg

h) Anastasia as portrayed in a later twelfth- or early thirteenth-century relief said to have come from her cathedral in Zadar and now in the Permanent Ecclesiastical Art Exhibition in the same city:
http://tinyurl.com/nsdtesv

i) Anastasia as depicted in a later thirteenth-century Book of Hours from Liège (Den Haag, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, ms. 76 G 17, fol. 213r):
http://tinyurl.com/38fs4tw

j) Anastasia (at right, after Sts. Barbara and Marina) as depicted in the late thirteenth-century frescoes (1280) of the church of the Panagia in Moutoullas (Nicosia prefecture), Republic of Cyprus:
http://tinyurl.com/mtetdrw

k) Anastasia's martyrdom by fire as depicted in a late thirteenth-century copy of French origin of the _Legenda aurea_ (San Marino, CA, Huntington Library, ms. HM 3027, fol. 8r [image greatly expandable]):
http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/ds/huntington/images//000854A.jpg

l) Anastasia (at left; at right, St. Chrysogonus) as portrayed in relief on the tympanum of the main portal of the late fourteenth century church of St. Michael in Zadar:
http://zarocroatia.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/stmichael-14th-century.jpg

m) Anastasia (at far right, after Sts. Florus, Nicholas of Myra, and Blasius / Blaise of Sebaste) as depicted on a wing of a late fourteenth- or early fifteenth-century Novgorod School wooden triptych now in the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow:
http://www.icon-art.info/hires.php?lng=en&type=1&id=513

n) Anastasia (at far right, after the prophet Elijah and St. Nicholas of Myra) as depicted on an early fifteenth-century Novgorod School icon now in the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow:
http://www.icon-art.info/hires.php?lng=en&type=1&id=565

o) Anastasia in prison (at left) as depicted in a later fifteenth-century copy (1463) of Vincent of Beauvais' _Speculum historiale_ in its French-language version by Jean de Vignay (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 51, fol. 95v):
http://tinyurl.com/2e6oqa5

p) Anastasia (at center, between St. Roch and St. Thomas of Canterbury) as depicted in a late fifteenth-century fresco (1493; restored in 1990) in the cappella di Sant'Anastasia in Sale San Giovanni (CN) in Piedmont:
http://tinyurl.com/km6cr3c

q) Anastasia (at right; at left, St. Euphrosyne) as depicted in the early sixteenth-century frescoes (1502) by Dionisy and sons in the Virgin Nativity cathedral of the St. Ferapont Belozero (Ferapontov Belozersky) monastery at Ferapontovo in Russia's Vologda oblast:
http://www.dionisy.com/eng/museum/116/216/index.shtml

r) Anastasia's martyrdom by fire as depicted in an earlier sixteenth-century fresco (1546/1547) by George / Tzortzis the Cretan in the katholikon of the Dionysiou monastery on Mt. Athos:
http://pemptousia.com/files/2013/12/Anastasia-Farmacolitria-Dionisiou-1547.jpg

s) Anastasia of Rome spewing blood under torture as depicted in an earlier sixteenth-century fresco (1546/1547) by George / Tzortzis the Cretan in the katholikon of the Dionysiou monastery on Mt. Athos:
http://pemptousia.com/files/2012/10/Anastasia-Romana-dionysiou-1547-IN.jpg


Typical images of Anastasia the Healer:

Anastasia has been venerated since the early Middle Ages as a healer of the effects of poison. In that role, for which she has a separate Passio (BHG 81; earliest witness is of the ninth century), she is widely shown holding a medicine bottle, as in these examples:

t) as depicted (at center, between St. Cataldus and St. Zosimus / Zosimas giving communion to St. Mary of Egypt) in a later medieval fresco in the crypt of Taranto's cattedrale di San Cataldo:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanaudino/4903624211/lightbox/

u) as depicted (at right; at left, a donor) in a thirteenth- or fourteenth-century fresco in the narthex of the originally twelfth-century church of the Panagia Phorbiotissa at Asinou near Nikitari (Nicosia prefecture) in the Republic of Cyprus:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/de/1/15/Asinou_Anastasia.jpg

v) as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (1330s) of the church of the Hodegetria in the Patriarchate of Peć at Peć in, depending upon one's view of the matter, either the Republic of Kosovo or Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija:
http://tinyurl.com/2ccv8bb

w) as depicted in a later fourteenth- or earlier fifteenth-century icon from Thessaloniki, now in the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg:
http://tinyurl.com/2cz9zws

A happy second day of Christmas to all,
John Dillon

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: subscribe medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: unsubscribe medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/medieval-religion

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

For help and support help@jisc.ac.uk

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager