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BCS-HCI  March 1999

BCS-HCI March 1999

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Subject:

Cfp: Special Issue of Personal technologies: DOMESTIC PERSONAL TECHNOLOGIES

From:

British HCI News <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

British HCI News <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 17 Mar 1999 15:50:17 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Parts/Attachments

text/plain (113 lines)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ BRITISH HCI GROUP ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~         http://www.bcs.org.uk/hci/          ~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ NEWS SERVICE ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~ All news to:[log in to unmask]  ~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~ Newsarchives:                               ~~
~~ http://www.mailbase.ac.uk/lists/bcs-hci/    ~~
~~ archive.html                                ~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

DOMESTIC PERSONAL TECHNOLOGIES

A Themed issue of Personal technologies (ISSN 0949-2054, Springer Verlag)

http://www.csm.uwe.ac.uk/faculty/cpim/PeTe.html

EDITOR
Richard Harper, University of Surrey

Deadline: 31 August 1999

The powerful impact of computing in the home is becoming increasingly 
apparent. With penetration rates of personal computing into the home 
as high as 60% in some countries, along with the increasing rollout 
of high-bandwidth cable networks capable of supporting data 
transmission and the increasing power/price ratio of computers and 
peripherals, computer technology is becoming a ubiquitous part of 
domestic surroundings. Although many researchers have studies 
computing in the home, it has largely been from the perspective of 
the use of workplace technologies such as email, internet or document 
creation. And, although there have been numerous research programmes 
investigating ubiquitous or pervasive computing, there has been 
little in the way of a systematic drawing together of the concept of 
'domestic computing' and its implications. Nor has there been any 
attempt to integrate studies of non computational technologies in the 
domestic environment. These technologies are themselves going through 
radical change as a result of the convergence of computational, 
mobile and other technologies. This convergence is having a major 
impact upon their role. For example, over 60% of all communication to 
the home is still undertaken by paper based mail. Yet new 
technologies are radically altering the nature of that mail both in 
terms of what it contains and who it is addressed to (e.g. the 
emergence of so-called personalised direct marketing). Moreover, the 
impact of interactive communications medium into the home, especially 
interactive tele-visual services, has not generated the advertising 
and organisational communications opportunities expected. The result 
is that the exact nature of the competition between old and new 
technologies in the home is far from clear or well understood.

CONTRIBUTIONS
This issue of Personal Technologies aims to draw together 
contributions which will go some way to predicting the future of 
technology in the home with more accuracy than analogies to previous 
technologies allow. Questions which contributions to the issue might 
address include:

*the relationship of ubiquitous technologies within the home and 
communication technologies in the wider environment

*computationally-enhanced real-world objects in the domestic environment

*future information and communication services that will exploit the 
developing domestic computing infrastructure

*the perceived value of communication and computing services in the home

*models for detailed analysis of existing and new services and systems

*supporting the variety of tasks which comprise domestic environments 
through technologies and services

*interfaces for domestic environments

*effects on larger social institutions

In line with the multidisciplinary nature of Personal Technologies, 
contributions can originate from computing, social and human 
sciences, engineering, or marketing, and can take the form of 
empirical studies, position papers, theoretical analyses or 
discussions of deployed systems.

DEADLINE
The deadline for contributions is 30 AUGUST, 1999. Contributions will 
be rapidly peer-reviewed by an international panel and will be 
published in volume 3 (1999) of Personal Technologies.

FORMAT
Contributions should follow the submission guidelines on the Personal 
technologies web site.Electronic submissions are preferred and should 
be mailed to <[log in to unmask]>

CONTACT
For advice on a submission, please contact

Richard Harper <[log in to unmask]>
Peter Thomas, editor-in-chief, <[log in to unmask]>

If you intend to provide a contribution, please make contact as soon as
possible.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~ NOTE: Please reply to article's originator, ~~
~~ not the News Service                        ~~
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