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ALLSTAT  1999

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Subject:

From:

dave waddington <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

dave waddington <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 8 Dec 1999 10:16:22 -0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

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text/plain (174 lines)


Peter Visscher has asked me to forward this message to the list.

Dave Waddington


FIRST (PRELIMINARY) ANNOUNCEMENT

SURVIVAL ANALYSIS APPLIED TO ANIMAL GENETICS 
AND EPIDEMIOLOGY

We are pleased to announce a postgraduate course in 
"Survival Analysis applied to Animal Genetics and 
Epidemiology" to be held at the Institute of Cell, Animal and 
Population Biology (ICAPB) of the University of Edinburgh in 
April 2000.

Teacher:   	Dr. Vincent.P. Ducrocq  (INRA, Jouy en 
Josas, France)
 
Dates:	 		10-14 April 2000
 
Location:		ICAPB, University of Edinburgh, King's 
Buildings, Edinburgh, Scotland
 
Course fee:		These will depend on the total number of 
participants. We aim to charge ~£50 per postgraduate 
student, ~£100 per postdoc/academic, and ~£200 for 
industry participants. Costs will include notes, 
morning/afternoon coffees, lunches. The exact costs will be 
set before the next announcement (January 2000)
 
A course description and more details will be placed on the 
WWW in due course (http://helios.bto.ed.ac.uk/icapb/).

COURSE DESCRIPTION
 
Survival Analysis applied to Animal Genetics and 
Epidemiology
Vincent P. Ducrocq
 
Objectives

Animal scientists (animal geneticists,  epidemiologists, 
economists, etc...) and biologists are often studying ways to 
increase the average length of productive life of domestic or 
experimental animals or to decrease  the frequency of 
involuntary cullings, and, in general, to understand variation 
in longevity. In human medicine,  there is great interest in 
the genetics of  longevity and age-at-onset of diseases.

Survival analysis represents a  special field in statistics 
because it deals with two types of data : "complete" 
records, when the "failure time" of the individual is known 
exactly,  and  "censored" records corresponding to the 
"current" length of life  when the individual is still alive at the 
end of the study period.  Sophisticated methods have been 
developed in the biomedical world to  better use all the 
information available (from both uncensored and  censored 
records). The use of such methods in animal and human 
genetics and  epidemiology appears particularly promising. 

The objective of the week is  to present the basic 
methodology of survival analysis. To facilitate the 
understanding of the concepts involved and to stimulate the 
use of these  techniques in data analyses, practicals will be 
included each day. These  practicals will make use of the « 
Survival Kit », (Ducrocq and Sölkner,  1998), a software 
specifically developed for survival analysis in animal 
genetics and epidemiology. In particular, it can be used to 
study the  influence of time-dependent effects (such as 
disease  occurrence or milk production in lactating 
animals). Random (e.g., genetic) effects can be included 
and their variance can be estimated. Some recent 
applications will also be presented.

Program outline : 
Day 1 : Introduction to survival analysis ; analysis of 
homogeneous
populations
Day 2 : Parametric and non parametric regression models 
Day 3 : Generalization (use of time-dependent covariates) ; 
some
computational aspects
Day 4 : Frailty (mixed) models ; estimation of genetic 
parameters
Day 5 : Applications in animal genetics and epidemiology : 
some examples
 
Requirements :
The presentation of the methodology of survival analysis will 
assume some  knowledge about probability distributions 
and basic statistics concepts.  But the main requirement is 
that the participants should have already  some experience 
with data analysis.
 
 
About the teacher
 
Vincent Ducrocq obtained his PhD in Animal Breeding (with 
minors in  Statistics and Computer Science) from Cornell 
University ( USA). He is  currently  Senior Research 
Scientist with INRA, and is located at the  Station on Applied 
and Quantitative Genetics (SGQA) of the Department of  
Animal Genetics at Jouy-en-Josas, France.  He is there 
leader of the  dairy cattle group, and he is also involved in 
teaching. His research  activities are related to genetic 
analysis of secondary traits in dairy  cattle. He is in charge 
of the routine evaluation of type traits and  longevity in dairy 
cattle in France.  He has given a course on survival  
analysis earlier in Denmark, Germany, USA, The 
Netherlands, Australia and France.
 
Some key papers on survival analysis are:
 
 
DUCROCQ V., QUAAS R.L., POLLAK E.J., CASELLA G., 
1988. Length of productive life of dairy cows. 	1: 
Justification of a Weibull model. J. Dairy Sci., 71, 3061-
3070. 

DUCROCQ V., QUAAS R.L., POLLAK E.J., CASELLA G., 
1988. Length of productive life of dairy cows.2: 	Variance 
component  estimation and sire evaluation J. Dairy Sci., 71, 
3071- 3079.

BEAUDEAU F., DUCROCQ  V., FOURICHON C., 
SEEGERS H., 1995. Effect of disease on length of 
productive life of French Holstein dairy cows assessed by 
survival  analysis. J. Dairy Sci., 	78, 103- 107. 

DUCROCQ V., CASELLA G., 1996.  A Bayesian analysis of 
mixed survival models. Genet. Sel. Evol, 28, 505-529. 

ESSIOUX L, ABEL L AND BONAITI-PELLIE (1995). Genetic 
epidemiology of breast cancer: interest of survival analysis 
methods. Ann Hum Genet 59: 271-282.

GRÖHN Y.T., DUCROCQ V., HERTL J. A., 1997. Modelling 
the effect of a disease on culling : an illustration of the use 
of time dependent  covariates in survival analysis.  J. Dairy 
Sci., 80, 1755-1766. 

PETERSEN JH (1998). An additive frailty model for 
correlated life times. Biometrics 54: 646-661.

YASHIN AI & IACHINE IA (1995). Genetic analysis of 
durations: correlated frailty model applied to survival of 
Danish twins. Genet Epid 12: 529-538.


Please express your interest in participating and registering 
for this course by email to me ([log in to unmask]).  
A formal announcement for registration (including payment) 
will be made early next year. Preference will be given to 
postgraduate students.

Peter Visscher
------- End of forwarded message -------
===============================
Peter Visscher
Institute of Ecology & Resource Management
University of Edinburgh
West Mains Road
Edinburgh EH9 3JG
Scotland, UK
tel. +44 131 535 4052
fax. +44 131 667 2601
email: [log in to unmask]
===============================


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