JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  December 1998

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION December 1998

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Collect of the Week - 29

From:

Bill East <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Sun, 20 Dec 1998 13:19:59 GMT

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (110 lines)

Collect of the Week - 29

Collect for Advent 4:

Excita, quaesumus, Domine, potentiam tuam, et veni, et magna nobis virtute
succurre, ut auxilium gratiae tuae, quod nostra peccata praepediunt,
indulgentia tuae propitiationis acceleret.  Qui vivis . . .

A very rough translation of my own, which we shall improve upon in the
exposition:

Stir up, we beseech thee, Lord, thy power, and come, and succour us by thy
great power, that the indulgence of thy propitiation may speed the help of
thy grace, which our sins impede.  Who livest . . .

Another 'stir up' Sunday,  and again addressed to the second person of the
Trinity rather than to the first.  Two words have been translated by the
English word 'power', i.e. 'potentia' and 'virtus'.  One may be splitting
hairs in attempting to distinguish between them;  but what is a scholastic
doctor for if not splitting hairs?  So, let me suggest, that 'potentia',
deriving from 'possum', to be able, speaks of what God can do, if he chooses
- his 'potential', that infinite reserve of power that can do all things -
rather than what in fact he does.  This 'potentia' is latent, rather than
actual;  it needs to be stirred up, and then it results in 'virtus', that
force which bursts into our lives to heal and save.  When the woman with the
issue of blood touches the hem of Jesus' garment, it is 'virtus' rather than
'potentia' which flows out of him.

'Excita' has been used for several weeks to begin our collects, and it is
intended to strike a note of 'excitement' as we approach the day of Christ's
coming.  So look at the urgency of this collect, the number of words
suggesting haste:  excita (arouse, awaken, excite) . . . succure (run to the
aid of) . . . acceleret (let it hasten).  

Praepedio is 'to hinder, impede, shackle' - something one would do to a
prisoner or slave, to stop him running away;  and such is the effect of our
sins.  'Indulgentia' is 'tenderness, mildness'.  'Indulgeo' is 'to be
courteous, mild'.  Its etymology is apparently dubious, but may be related
to 'dulcis', 'sweet'.  'Propitiatio', 'atonement, appeasement, propitiation'
is a post-classical word;  it is most commonly used in Christian literature.
It refers very clearly to the atonement wrought by Christ.  Cf. John 2:2,
'ipse est propitiatio pro peccatis nostris' - 'He is the Propitiation for
our sins.'  One might almost see it here as a title, comparable with 'Your
Majesty' - 'May the tenderness of Your Propitiation speed the help of your
grace . . .'

This collect was translated by the reformers and their translation serves as
an interesting transition between their policy in the collects for the first
three weeks of Advent of writing an entirely new one, longer and based more
obviously and explicitly on scripture, and their later policy - perhaps
dictated by the approach of the deadline - of doing a (more or less)
straightforward translation.  This one, as we shall see, is more of an
explanatory paraphrase than a translation, teasing out some of the points
which I myself have made, and inserting a substantial passage of scripture:

O Lord, raise up (we pray thee) thy power, and come among us, and with great
might succour us;  that whereas, through our sins and wickedness, we are
sore let and hindered in running the race that is set before us, thy
bountiful grace and mercy may speedily deliver us;  through the satisfaction
of thy Son our Lord, to whom with thee and the Holy ghost be honour and
glory, world without end.  Amen.

A contender for the Nobel Prize for Repetition:  'sins and wickedness', 'let
and hindered', 'grace and mercy'.    The implications of 'praepediunt' are
spelled out in 'we are sore let and hindered in running the race that is set
before us' - one word in the Latin, fifteen in the English, demonstrating
very clearly the different approaches of the Latin Collector and the English
reformers.  The phrase is taken from Hebrews 12:1,  " . . . let us lay aside
every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with
patience the race that is set before us."  'Propitiatio' is moved to the end
and rendered, fairly enough, as 'satisfaction'.  We have already noted how
chary the reformers were of referring to the atonement in the body of the
collect, lest it be thought they were ascribing some atoning power to the
Mass itself.  Here there is no doubt that the satisfaction is wrought by
Christ himself, independent of the Mass.

The modern Missal, God bless it, does not use this collect but employs (or
rather, mutilates) an old friend from another context:

Lord, fill our hearts with your love, and as you revealed to us by an angel
the coming of your Son as man, so lead us through his suffering and death to
the glory of his resurrection, for he lives and reigns with you and the Holy
Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

This is a sort of attempt to translate the post-communion collect for the
Annunciation:

Gratiam tuam, quaesumus, Domine, mentibus nostris infunde:  ut qui angelo
nuntiante Christi Filii tui incarnationem cognovimus, per passionem ejus et
crucem ad resurrectionis gloriam perducamur.  Per eundem.

The reformers made this the collect for the day, objecting to the existing
one as it invoked the intercession of Mary.  Their translation however is a
good one:

We beseech thee, O Lord, pour thy grace into our hearts;  that, as we have
known the incarnation of thy Son Jesus Christ by the message of an angel, so
by his cross and passion we may be brought unto the glory of his
resurrection;  through the same Jesus Christ our Lord.  

Unlike ICEL, the reformers were content to render 'gratiam' by 'grace',
'incarnationem' as 'incarnation', and 'crucem' by 'cross'.

Oriens, sive Magister Collectarum.




%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager