JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  December 1998

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION December 1998

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Collect for Prime - 1

From:

Bill East <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Tue, 8 Dec 1998 15:54:32 GMT

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (115 lines)

Collect for Prime - 1

Stan Metheny confided to me that he once did a full-length exegesis of the
Collect for Prime but no longer has a copy of this opus.  I hope my own
efforts in this direction bring a little seasonal joy into his life, and
into your lives.

Our Collect is somewhat Protean, changing both form and function in the
various sacramentaries and missals.  Goulburn gives a translation (though
not the Latin text) of the earliest version, in the Gelasian Sacramentary.
Here it appears as one of a series of short prayers, headed "Prayers at Matins":

We give thee thanks, holy Lord, almighty Father, everlasting God, who hast
vouchsafed to bring us, after passing through the period of the night, to
the hours of the morning.  Grant us, we beseech thee, to pass this day
without sin, so that at eventide we may return thanks [to thee].  Through.

It appears in a more expanded form in the Gregorian Sacramentary:

Deus, qui nos ad principium hujus diei pervenire fecisti, da nobis hunc diem
sine peccato transire;  ut in nullo a tuis semitis declinemus, sed ad tuam
justitiam faciendam nostra semper procedant eloquia.  Per (etc).

"O God, who hast brought us to the beginning of this day, grant us to pass
through it without sin, that in nothing we may turn aside out of thy paths,
but that the words which go forth from us may be always directed to do that
which is righteous in thy sight.  Through (etc)."

In the Roman Breviary it is appointed for Prime.  It may be helpful to
explain what is meant by "Prime", and indeed by the other terms, "Matins,
Lauds, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, Compline";  and so I shall;  but let me
first complete my accounts of the various texts of our Collect.

The form in the Roman Breviary is as follows:

Domine Deus omnipotens, qui ad principium hujus diei nos pervenire fecisti:
tua nos hodie salva virtute;  ut in hac die ad nullam declinemus peccatum,
sed semper ad tuam justitiam faciendam nostra procedant eloquia, dirigantur
cogitationes et opera.  Per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum filium tuum, qui
tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti Deus, per omnia saecula
saeculorum.

"O Lord God Almighty, who hast brought us to the beginning of this day,
defend us today by thy mighty power, that in this day we may turn aside to
no sin, but that our words may go forth, and our thoughts and actions be
directed to do that which is righteous in thy sight.  Through our Lord Jesus
Christ, thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy
Ghost, God for ever and ever."

The Sarum Breviary however has a slightly different form:

Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus, qui nos ad principium hujus
diei pervenire fecisti;  tua nos hodie salva virtute;  et concede ut in hac
die ad nullum declinemus peccatum, nec ullum incurramus periculum, sed
semper ad tuam justitiam faciendam omnis nostra actio tuo moderamine
dirigatur.  Per (etc).

The Reformers translated this as "The third Collect at Morning Prayer, for
Grace":

O Lord, our heavenly Father, Almighty and everlasting God, who hast safely
brought us to the beginning of this day;  Defend us in the same with thy
mighty power;  and grant that this day we fall into no sin, neither run into
any kind of danger;  but that all our doings may be ordered by thy
governance, to do always that is righteous in Thy sight;  through Jesus
Christ our Lord.  Amen.

And now the promised word about Prime.  This is "Prima Hora", the first hour
of the day, that is, an hour after sunrise.  At the Equinox, this would
occur at 7 am;  in the winter, rather later, in the summer, rather earlier.
It is one of the "canonical hours" at which the Church has traditionally
offered prayers.  The full schedule is as follows:

Matins - said at midnight, or in the early hours.
Lauds - said at dawn.
Prime - as aforsaid, said soon after dawn.
Terce - i.e. "Tertia Hora", the third hour.  At the Equinox this would be 9 am.
Sext - i.e. "Sexta Hora", the sixth hour, which is actually noon whatever
the time of year.
None - i.e. "Nona Hora", the ninth hour, mid-afternoon.
Vespers - said at sunset.
Compline - "Completorium", the completion of the daily round of prayer, said
at bed-time.

This eight-fold office is related by St Benedict [Rule of St Benedict, ch.
16] to two verses from the psalms, "Seven times I have sung thy praises" [Ps
118(119):164] and "At midnight I arose to confess to thee" [Ps 118(119):62].

Terce, Sext and None seem to be of pre-Christian (i.e. Jewish) origin.
Daniel is said to have prayed three times a day (Daniel 6:10).  A threefold
office may perhaps be implied by Ps. 54(55):17, "Evening and morning and at
noon I utter my complaint."  The Apostles were gathered for prayer at the
Third Hour, when the Holy Spirit was sent upon them (Cf. Acts 2:15);  "Peter
went up on the housetop to pray, about the sixth hour" (Acts 10:9) and
"Peter and John were going up to the temple at the hour of prayer, the ninth
hour" (Acts 3:1).  These three are attested by Clement of Alexandria,
Cyprian and others as times of private prayer;  but it is not until the 5th
century that we find public services attached to them.

According to Cassian, Prime was introduced as 'altera matutina', a second
Matins, in his monastery in Bethlehem about 395 AD.  It was first recited in
the dormitory, then became part of the choir office, and finally became
recognised as part of the office even of the secular (non-monastic) clergy.
In 1964 its recitation was made voluntary for the secular clergy, and it
finds no mention at all in the current Breviary.  I don't know if any
religious orders anywhere still recite it;  perhaps Mon Lib could enlighten us.

Tomorrow I hope to begin my detailed exegesis of the Collect for Prime.

Magister Collectarum.



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager