JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MINING-HISTORY Archives


MINING-HISTORY Archives

MINING-HISTORY Archives


mining-history@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MINING-HISTORY Home

MINING-HISTORY Home

MINING-HISTORY  1998

MINING-HISTORY 1998

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

America's Mining History

From:

[log in to unmask] (Peter Claughton)

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Sun, 20 Dec 1998 23:42:43 GMT

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (88 lines)

America's Mining Heritage
Culural Resource Mangement, Vol. 21, Issue No. 7 (1998)
Published by the US Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

Although this themed issue of Cultural Resource Management covers the
vestiges of mining across the northern half of the American continent, from
Mexico to Canada and the Alaskan north, it addresses many problems which
will be familiar to mining historians on this side of the Atlantic.  

In his introductory paper Robet Spude emphasises  the diverse nature of
American mining heritage, and that is evident in the content of this issue,
but points out that there is more to mining history than the physical
presence of mines and mills.  He highlights the need to examine 'the great
cultural diversity, and the resulting social and political fabric' of
mining.  Mining history, he says, needs new direction - 'There is a need for
new points of view and historical methodologies.'

This man is speaking a language that I can understand!

The papers presented in this issue are a catalogue of successes in
conserving, protecting and managing mining hertitage over the last ten
years.  I am particularly impressed by the work done in preserving the
Mayflower Mill at Silverton, Colorado.  Perhaps a project of this scale -
retaining a complete mid 20th century flotation mill, whilst fulfilling the
statutory requirements for contaminated land reclamation - are something we
in the UK can only dream of but it shows that, even in the most litigatious
of countries, the determined efforts of local groups can challenge the
perceived role of public protection agencies. 

Whilst the vast areas and public control of National Parks in the US might
suggest to us an ideal opportunity for the preservation of mining landscapes
they do bring problems of their own.  Free public access to wilderness areas
presents a threat of litigation over accidents involving open mine
entrances, the remedy for which is generally total closure, something which,
thank goodness, has not yet become standard practice in this country.  The
problems of identifying and conserving mine sites in the vast wilderness
areas of Alaska are dealt with in Logan Hovis's paper - Finding Them Was the
Easy Part - a title which hints at the on-going task of  the mining
historian in what is still an active prospecting field.

Other problems encountered are more familar to the European mining
historian.  We can appreciate the work of  Brick, Thorson and Poirer in
mapping the un-documented Jinny Hill Mines in Connecticut; and the
identification and proper handling of  mine resident bat populations is a
familiar, sometimes sensitive, subject; as is the interpretation of museum
sites like Newgate Prison and Copper Mine, Connecticut.

The closing paper by  Homer Milford, on the threats to American mining
heritage, raises the point that the accelerating loss of mining sites is
'not because of the gradual effects of wind, weather and vandals. but
primarily due to well-intended government programs, professional
mining-orientated artifact collectors, and new open pit mines.'   Whilst we
might regard the collectors as vandals, and in the Irish Republic they would
probably be regarded as criminals, it is the similarity between government
programmes in the US and those which are gathering momentum here which
catches my attention.  Milford, as a co-ordinator for one of the US
programmes, is well placed to put this common problem in perspective.

America's Mining Heritage is useful reading for those keen to compare
progress in mining history management on the other side of the Atlantic with
experiences at home.  The electronic version is accessible on the web at URL
<http://www.cr.nps.gov/crm>  Go to the Index of Past Issues - Vol. 21, No. 7
- for the contents list, but you will need Adobe Acrobat to read the text.

Peter

_____________________________________________

Peter Claughton, Blaenpant Morfil, Rosebush, Clynderwen, 
Pembrokeshire, Wales  SA66 7RE.    
Tel. 01437 532578; Fax. 01437 532921; Mobile 0831 427599

University of Exeter, Dept. of  History   
E-mail:  [log in to unmask]

Co-owner - mining-history e-mail discussion list.  
See http://www.mailbase.ac.uk/lists/mining-history/  for details.

Mining History Pages - http://www.exeter.ac.uk/~pfclaugh/mhinf/

_____________________________________________





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager