JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  July 1996

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION July 1996

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: hymn help

From:

[log in to unmask] (Dale Streeter)

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Fri, 12 Jul 1996 10:48:35 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (58 lines)

On Thu, 11 July you wrote:
>Music played a central role in the services of the church. The
>Divine Office of the monks was chanted and sung, with the Psalms
>as a central component. The mass and other liturgical services
>included chants, antiphons, as well as lyrics especially written
>for the services.  Of the many hymns written in the medieval
>period, a group of seven are considered classics. One of the
>seven great hymns is reprinted below, with a literal translation.
> All of these hymns were composed in Latin. Latin, like Greek, is
>an inflected language: it uses endings on words to indicate
>grammatical function (subject, direct object, indirect object)
>rather than position in the sentence, as with modern English (Man
>bites dog? or Dog bites man? It makes a big difference where you
>put the words). Consequently, Latin sentences are leaner and can
>get by with less helper words (such as "by" and "with"). Latin
>poetry then has a clean simplicity in its appearance, in which
>each word bears a great deal of weight and often multiple
>meanings. The structure of the sentences are
>aesthetically satisfying and can serve to enhance meaning.
> Although no translation does justice to another language, it is
>possible to examine the original side-by-side with a literal
>translation and see how the poetry works. No effort has been made
>in the translation on the right to invent English rhyming or
>meter. To hear the patterning of this poem, read the Latin on the
>left side. This hymn, and the other classic hymns, are also available
>in innumerable versions by later composers, including....

Karen,

I realize that the above is a draft but allow me to suggest some revisions
and additions that may be helpful. To begin with, chanted and sung mean the
same thing, why use both. The variety of songs include psalms, antiphons,
hymns, sequences and so on. A web site that I'm sure would be useful for
you is Cantus, which you can reach through the Medieval Labyrinth site at
Georgetown University and has an extensive document file on plain chant
that describes the types and their uses in the Divine Office. There is also
a book on medieval music by Yunkin (?).

 I also agree with the suggestion to use the correct nomenclature for parts
of speach rather than "helper words" (also, the adjective "fewer" should be
used in reference to numbers rather than "less"). Finally, the hymn _Veni
creator spiritus_ is traditionally ascribed to Rauban Maurus, the great
ninth century abbot of Fulda, and the "praeceptor germania." As a result of
my research I have found that the Fourth Lateran Council (1215) required
the hymn to be sung by the cathedral chapter when it convened to elect a
new bishop.

Good luck with your book.

=====================
Dale R. Streeter
Department of History
University of Wisconsin-Madison




%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JISCMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager