JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  December 2017

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING December 2017

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Thought on time, temporality and new media public artwork

From:

David Rokeby <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

David Rokeby <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 19 Dec 2017 10:25:15 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (39 lines)

> I agree with David - almost entirely. I would just reiterate that there
> is a huge difference between watching a recording of a performance (of
> dance, or other live art) and experiencing it live in all its
> multi-sensory complexity. Watching a recording, if it is very good, I
> get some sense of kinesthetic empathy with the performer (as an
> ex-surfer I get this watching a recording of a surfer). But most
> recordings do not transfer that dimension of a work. In live situations
> all the senses are engaged and one moves with the dancers - you are also
> performing, you are not watching anymore. Empathy is total, at least
> when it’s a good performance.
> 
> There was an interesting research project on this:
> http://www.watchingdance.org/ <http://www.watchingdance.org/> <http://www.watchingdance.org/ <http://www.watchingdance.org/>>

Of course with a video of a performance, we can also have privileged views… impossible closeups, sounds of breathing, etc. that we cannot have live. 

On the other hand, we can tie this up nicely if we agree that the audience is also a performer, integral to the live performance. That one thing that distinguishes live performance from a recording is that the audience is in a feedback loop with the performers, and in one way or another modulating the performance with the energy of their attention and their responses.

Perhaps we can agree that there is a continuum here, varying within media as well as across media disciplines of the importance of the instrumentality of the audience. The difference with new media is perhaps that the seemingly impossible task of the live performance of infinite duration becomes tantalizingly realizable because of the infinite patience of the computer and the marginal incremental cost of each additional hour of performance. The challenges of maintenance remain of course, and while they may seem virtually insurmountable, they are so much simpler, in theory, and at least to a degree, in practise, than the infinite performance of live dance or music.

We could argue that some lives are performances aspiring to as near to infinite duration as possible, but then we really are, I think, talking about something else.

Infinite duration is not the only temporal advantage here… there is also constant availability. A live performance can challenge our ideas and feelings about a space for a time, and that experience may live on in memory. A new media installation can provide this transformation continuously and cumulatively. Its effects can seep into our consciousness over extended periods of time, if it occurs in a location we visit frequently. They are experienced in an involuntary manner. The audience generally does not seek it out, and does not prepare themselves for it, so it provides a substantially different kind of experience to the user than is possible in museums or at scheduled events. (this has advantages and disadvantages of course…)

In the end, I think I am arguing that we are sacrificing something remarkable when we let our exhaustion and frustration wear us down to the point that we accept that our works should simply operate for the duration of an exhibition or two and then die. But I am not being absolutist here… any work should be allowed the dignity of a timely death… Any artist must be allowed to make their own decisions about the relative merits of investing time in the durability of the work versus spending that time and energy on new work as long as they understand the consequences.

I am arguing for a plurality of options. We need to develop a language of temporality around these kinds of works that allows artists and curators and commissioners and conservators to discuss these issues frankly and to seek solutions to each example that understand the unique propositions and circumstances of that work. The required framework is not a single solution, but a shared language that helps to define and describe the space of possibilities.

David

------------------------------------------------------------------
David Rokeby
135 Manning Avenue
Toronto, Ontario M6J 2K6 Canada
(416) 603-4640
[log in to unmask]
http://www.davidrokeby.com
------------------------------------------------------------------

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager