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BASEES-MEMBERS  October 2017

BASEES-MEMBERS October 2017

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Subject:

New books by Anthem Press and Oxford University Press

From:

"Grant, Susan" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Grant, Susan

Date:

Tue, 10 Oct 2017 16:21:39 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (54 lines)

Dear Members,

The following books might be of interest:

Secret Agents and the Memory of Everyday Collaboration in Communist Eastern Europe edited by Péter Apor, Sándor Horváth and James Mark (Anthem Press)

An information sheet for this book can be found here<http://www.anthempress.com/pdf/9781783087235.pdf>. For more information on this book please visit the book’s webpage here:www.anthempress.com<http://www.anthempress.com/> and 9781783087235<http://www.anthempress.com/secret-agents-and-the-memory-of-everyday-collaboration-in-communist-eastern-europe>

BOOK INFORMATION
Book Summary
'Secret Agents and the Memory of Everyday Collaboration in Communist Eastern Europe' examines the ways in which post-Communist societies have sought to make sense of Communist-era collaboration. The book begins with an exploration of the history and social role of secret police archives and institutes of national memory, which in most of the post-Communist countries were created by governments to tackle the tasks of systematizing records and making it possible to interrogate memories of collaboration. According to the book, however, these institutions instrumentalize and, hence, exert a stronger influence on the production of concepts of collaboration than other organs of memory politics. The book then analyses communities of cooperation, with particular focus on local and mid-level party organizations, organs of the church, and artistic and intellectual networks. It explores the motivations for becoming an agent and the moralities of this role, as well as the personal decisions and social consequences involved in this process and, in particular, the collective and individual strategies with which individuals and communities are now attempting to make sense of these memories.

About the Author
Sándor Horváth is a permanent Research Fellow and the Head of Department for Contemporary History at the Institute of History, Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

James Mark is professor of history at University of Exeter. His research addresses the social and cultural history of state socialism in central-eastern Europe, the politics of memory in the area during both socialism and post-socialism.

Péter Apor is a permanent research fellow at the Institute of History, Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

About Anthem Press
Anthem Press is a leading independent publisher of innovative academic research, educational material and reference works in established and emerging fields.




Sergei Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky by Kevin Bartig (Oxford University Press)

Audiences have long enjoyed Sergei Prokofiev's musical score for Sergei Eisenstein's 1938 film Alexander Nevsky. The historical epic cast a thirteenth-century Russian victory over invading Teutonic Knights as an allegory of contemporary Soviet strength in the face of Nazi warmongering. Prokofiev's and Eisenstein's work proved an enormous success, both as a collaboration of two of the twentieth century's most prominent artists and as a means to bolster patriotism and national pride among Soviet audiences. Arranged as a cantata for concert performance, Prokofiev's music for Alexander Nevsky music proved malleable, its meaning reconfigured to suit different circumstances and times. Author Kevin Bartig draws on previously unexamined archival materials to follow Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky from its inception through the present day. He considers the music's genesis as well as the surprisingly different ways it has engaged listeners over the past eighty years, from its beginnings as state propaganda in the 1930s to showpiece for high-fidelity recording in the 1950s to open-air concert favorite in the post-Soviet 1990s.

OUP can offer a 30% off discount code for this title (originally priced at $14.95), partner on a giveaway, or offer a copy if you are interested in publishing a book review.

Please contact Sarah Lee at OUP for more information ([log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>).


With kind regards,
Susan


Susan Grant, PhD
Acting Secretary, British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES)

Lecturer in Modern European History
School of Humanities and Social Science
Liverpool John Moores University
89-98 Mount Pleasant
Liverpool
L3 5UZ


T: 0151 2313618

________________________________
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