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Subject:

CIAS Masterclasses

From:

CIAS Newcastle University <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

CIAS Newcastle University <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 10 May 2016 21:12:49 +0100

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*Apologies for cross posting*
 
List members are reminded that bookings are still open for the single-day material skills workshops organised by the Cluster for Interdisciplinary Artefact Studies (CIAS) at Newcastle University. These will be taking place from 3-10 June 2016. Further details can be found at http://research.ncl.ac.uk/cias/masterclasses/.
 
Yours faithfully,
 
Dr Thea Ravasi
CIAS Coordinator
[log in to unmask]
 
CIAS 2016 Masterclasses
Incorporating Small Finds into your Research (Dr Rob Collins)
Small finds and artefacts are typically studied by specialists within the discipline of archaeology, who employ their knowledge to catalogue, type, and date the objects discovered through excavation and other means. Yet these objects have utility and value for researchers of archaeology, history, museum studies and heritage more generally. This 1-day workshop provides a practical introduction to the specialist study of small finds, deconstructed to enable post-graduate and early career researchers to understand the way in which this information is compiled and thus be integrated into their own research successfully. Direct examination of artefacts will be incorporated into the course.
Human Osteology (Tori Park)
The course will focus on the identification of human bones, basic osteology, key pathologies, best practice during excavation (including recording and lifting), as well as the post excavation processing and retention of remains. Care during excavation and post excavation will aid in robust data collection, and contribute to a full, detailed analysis of remains. The practical skills will be set against the legal, planning and ethical context in which human remains are excavated and introduce participants to current best practice and standards.
Introduction to Zooarchaeology (Don O’Meara)
This course aims to highlight the uses of zooarchaeology as a means to understanding both archaeological site formation and past human societies in archaeological projects. It is aimed both at field archaeologists and those who may be working on post-excavation interpretations of archaeological projects. The day course aims to give attendees the knowledge needed to integrate zooarchaeological sampling into their projects by presenting some of the important research themes in zooarchaeological analysis, by discussing sampling procedures and how they affect project outcomes, and by discussing archiving procedures both on and off site. As an outcome of this course attendees will be better versed to engage with zooarchaeological specialists and zooarchaeological data when planning and executing their project.
Roman and Byzantine Coinage (Dr James Gerrard)
This workshop is designed for archaeologists with no (or very little) training or experience of working with Roman and early Byzantine coins. Participants will have the opportunity to handle genuine Roman and Byzantine coins and be provided with the skills to begin to identify and interpret these coins archaeologically.
Lithic Technologies (Dr Rob Young)
This course will introduce students to British prehistoric lithic (stone tool) technology, exploring the chronology and typology of stone tools from their earliest use by humans in Britain to the end of the Iron Age. It will highlight key themes in the contemporary interpretation of stone tools and their function(s), and provide a hands-on approach to techniques of lithic assemblage analysis and the production and use of artefact reports.
The Digital Illustration of Ceramics (Dr Maria Duggan)
This practical course will offer an introduction to the production of digital illustrations of archaeological ceramics for publication. It will introduce basic techniques in the use of vector graphics software – specifically Adobe Illustrator CS6 – to produce simple 2D line illustrations. The course is intended for those without previous experience of digital illustration, although familiarity with archaeological ceramics and pottery illustration by hand would be beneficial.
Metalwork Use-wear Analysis (Dr Andrea Dolfini)
The course provides a hands-on introduction to the use-wear analysis of metal objects, focusing in particular on prehistoric copper alloys. Use-wear analysis enables the recognition, evaluation, and interpretation of the marks visible on ancient and historic metalwork by observation and optical microscopy. It may yield tremendous insights into the life-cycle of objects including their manufacture, use, repair, deposition, and post-depositional history. The course comprises a short theoretical introduction to prehistoric copper-alloy technology and use-wear analysis, followed by hands-on sessions in which participants will learn how to observe, record, and interpret the marks visible on original prehistoric bronzes (in particular axe-heads and swords). Extensive reference collections of replica bronzes will also be available. This course does not require background knowledge of materials science or optical microscopy and I open to all participants interested in the scientific methods used in archaeometallurgy.
Palaeography of English scripts c.1500-1900 (Sally Gerrard)
This course will introduce archaeologists and historians to the scripts in use in England from c.1500 – 1900. Workshop participants will be introduced to the development of formal and informal English scripts in the post-Medieval period and will gain practical experience in reading and transcribing. No prior experience of palaeography is required for this course.

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