JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MAT-REN Archives


MAT-REN Archives

MAT-REN Archives


MAT-REN@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MAT-REN Home

MAT-REN Home

MAT-REN  March 2016

MAT-REN March 2016

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

CONF: Patrons' input (RSA)

From:

Rupert Shepherd <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Rupert Shepherd <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 29 Mar 2016 15:54:05 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (127 lines)

The following sessions, brought to my attention by the Collecting and 
Display Seminar,  may be of interest for anyone attending the 
Renaissance Society of America's annual conference in Boston from 31 
March to 2 April 2016. Conference details at 
http://www.rsa.org/?page=2016Boston, schedule at 
http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/rsa/rsa16/


The Patrons' Input I
Chair: Andrea M. Gáldy

Thu, March 31, 1:30 to 3:00pm, Hynes Convention Center, Level Two, 204

Adriana Turpin, Buontalenti and Francesco and Ferdinando de’ Medici

The architect Bernardo Buontalenti is famous for his projects for Grand 
Dukes Francesco and Ferdinando de’ Medici (1574-1609). Nonetheless, his 
relationship with his patrons and the nature and extent of their 
involvement with these projects remain obscure. This paper proposes to 
investigate the creation of two of Buontalenti’s projects in the Uffizi, 
the theatre and the Tribuna, and place them in the Florentine 
intellectual context at the end of the sixteenth century. It has long 
been accepted that the grand dukes themselves commissioned these spaces 
and decided on questions of decoration and display. Closer analysis of 
the court culture under Francesco and under Ferdinand after 1587, 
provides more detailed insights into the role of some courtiers. 
Accordingly, the focus will be on the musical circles in Florence, in 
particular those of Giovanni Bardi.

Susan Nalezyty, Writing and Buying: Pietro Bembo as Patron and Collector

As an author seeking new literary models, Pietro Bembo shared 
corresponding aims with visual artist friends, individuals who sometimes 
provided insights into the works he sought, acquired, displayed, loaned, 
and received as gifts. This scholarly collector’s career took him away 
from his celebrated collection in his Paduan palazzo and villa. Bembo 
served as his own buying agent with a trusted curator at home, though he 
often complains in epistolary evidence of strained economic 
circumstances. He brought works to Urbino, Venice and Rome, which 
informed his stylistic preferences, unique for his deep experience of 
these contexts near princely and papal collections. He valued not just 
monumental paintings, but portable objects of different media, and just 
as important were his visitors. Prominent authors wrote of what they 
saw, providing access to issues of usage and reception of Bembo’s works, 
which traveled up and down the Italian peninsula with him throughout his 
life.

Gregory A. Grämiger, The Patrons’ Joys and Struggles in Three University 
Collections

Already in the 16th century, the University of Leiden established a 
library, a botanical garden, a theatre of anatomy and different cabinets 
of curiosities. Specialized professors were responsible for establishing 
and ordering the different collections. Sometimes, they even ignored 
scientific facts to follow their own interests. Fellow colleagues 
disagreed with their works. Students wanted unrestricted access to the 
latest books and artefacts, while visitors paid an entrance fee and 
expected to see unknown curiosities. Donators were generous but in 
return wanted to be remembered infinitely. The advisory board of the 
university was mainly concerned with financial problems. The patrons 
were also dependent on voyagers and distant colleagues to receive 
extraordinary exhibits. The fate of their collection was in jeopardy 
when successors took over. Working extensively with primary sources, the 
paper intends to give insights into the patrons’ joys and struggles in 
hosting three collections of an early modern university.


The Patrons' Input II
Chair: Susan Bracken

Thu, March 31, 3:30 to 5:00pm, Hynes Convention Center, Level Two, 204

Nathan Flis, The Paston Treasure

The Paston Treasure is the first painting to depict an English 
Schatzkammer and will be the focus of an exhibition at the Yale Center 
for British Art and Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery in 2018. The 
painting was commissioned, c. 1676-79, by Sir Robert Paston, 1st Earl of 
Yarmouth (1631-1683). Recent conservation treatment has revealed 
iconographic puzzles within its painted layers that underlie apparent 
changes of decision and iconography, by artist and patron, to create its 
final appearance. The painting is an iconic memorial to the collecting 
of Sir William Paston, 1st Baronet of Oxnead (1610-1663), who travelled 
through Europe, reaching Alexandria and Jerusalem in 1638-39. A number 
of recently discovered inventories of Oxnead Hall, the countryseat built 
by Sir William, reveal that Oxnead housed an extensive collection of 
curiosities, schatzkammer objects and paintings, until now lost to the 
record.

Alesandra Becucci, Ho visto la prontezza del pittore: 
Seventeenth-Century Military Nobility’s Art Purchases

The paper considers the role of seventeenth-century military noblemen in 
the Habsburg service in the process of building up their art 
collections. In particular, it explores the Habsburg military nobility’s 
actual involvement in the choice of artworks and in the maintenance of 
contacts with artists producing them. The mobility inherent to these 
noblemen’s military and diplomatic activity often implied the need of a 
reliable network of agents, able to carry out the patrons’ orders for 
purchases, payments and display. On the other hand, frequent 
displacements on duty allowed this nobility to directly get in touch 
with the most active art markets in Europe. By considering an unusual 
category of patrons and their collecting habits, this paper argues that 
patronage practices and luxury acquisitions in early modern Europe 
should be reconsidered as operating at several levels, depending on 
context, circumstances, and mediators conditioning the patrons’ choices.

Tomasz Grusiecki, Connoisseurship as a Dialogic Process: The Kunstkammer 
of Sigismund III Vasa

Sigismund III Vasa (r. 1587-1632) was the first Polish-Lithuanian 
monarch to create a Kunstkammer in his official residence. However, 
historians of early modern art collecting have traditionally assumed 
that Polish-Lithuanian model of connoisseurship was a direct transplant 
from major European cultural centres. In this paper, I contend against 
classifying the transfer of an art-collecting practice from western 
Europe to Poland-Lithuania as an unmediated cultural diffusionism from 
the centre to a periphery. I argue that Sigismund’s cultural input was 
crucial in producing a local form of connoisseurship. Polish-Lithuanian 
gentry so fervently attacked and rejected art collecting as a 
respectable mode of sociability that Sigismund and his defenders needed 
to get their act together. A series of clashes between the court and the 
gentry offered a unique context in which to debate the value of art. 
 From this dialogic tension, a specific set of conditions emerges where 
Sigismund’s agency as a collector can be re-considered.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
August 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager